John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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firmed <​confirming​> <​us​> in the opinion that the nights proceedings before, in relation to their desire to have us give bail, was a mere ruse to seperate us. We were not permitted to speak with , the real charge against whom was— that he was travelling in or its neighborhood; what the fictitious one was, if I <​then​> knew, I have since forgotten, as things of this kind were then of daily occurrense.
After waiting the ’s pleasure, for some time, we had an audience; but such an audience! He was surrounded by some of the vilest and most unprincipled men in creation; some of them had an appearance of respectability; but many of them lacked even that. , and I believe were there, , and , a Lawyer from ; a Mobocratic Merchant from , the aforesaid Jackson, a number of his associates Mr. [blank] the s secretary in all some fifteen or twenty persons, most of whom were recreant to virtue, honor, integrity and everything that is considered honorable among men. I can well remember the feelings of disgust that I had in seeing the surrounded by such an infamous group, and on being introduced to men of so questionable a character; and had I been on private business I should have turned to depart, and told the that if he thought proper to associate with such questionable characters, I should beg leave to be excused; but coming, as we did, on public business, we could not, of course, consult [p. 21]
confirming us in the opinion that the nights proceedings before, in relation to their desire to have us give bail, was a mere ruse to seperate us. We were not permitted to speak with , the real charge against whom was— that he was travelling in or its neighborhood; what the fictitious one was, if I then knew, I have since forgotten, as things of this kind were then of daily occurrense.
After waiting the ’s pleasure, for some time, we had an audience; but such an audience! He was surrounded by some of the vilest and most unprincipled men in creation; some of them had an appearance of respectability; but many of them lacked even that. , and I believe were there, , and , a Lawyer from ; a Mobocratic Merchant from , the aforesaid Jackson, a number of his associates Mr. [blank] the s secretary in all some fifteen or twenty persons, most of whom were recreant to virtue, honor, integrity and everything that is considered honorable among men. I can well remember the feelings of disgust that I had in seeing the surrounded by such an infamous group, and on being introduced to men of so questionable a character; and had I been on private business I should have turned to depart, and told the that if he thought proper to associate with such questionable characters, I should beg leave to be excused; but coming, as we did, on public business, we could not, of course, consult [p. 21]
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