John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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being a second time mutilated or killed. Many of the mob too came around and treated me with apparent respect, and the officers and people generally looked upon me as <​a​> hostage and <​feared​> that my removal would be the signal for the rising of the mormons.
I do not remember the time that I stayed there; but I think three or four days after the murder, When with a carriage, Br. , with a Waggon, Dr. Ells and a number of others on horseback came, for the purpose of taking me to . I was very weak at the time, occasioned by loss of blood and the great discharge of my wounds, so that when Mrs. Taylor asked me if I could talk I could barely whisper, no. Quite a disscussion arose as to the propriety of my removal, the physicians and people of protesting it would be my death, whilst my friends were anxious for my removal, if possible. I suppose the former were actuated by the above named principle desire to keep me. Col Jones was, I believe, sincere; he had acted as a friend all the time, and he told Mrs. Taylor she ought to persuade me to not to go, for he did not believe I had strength enough to reach . It was finally agreed, however, that I should go; but as it was thought that I could not stand riding in a waggon or carriage, they prepared a hand-carriage <​litter​> for me, I was carried down stairs and put upon it. A number of men assisted to carry me, some of whom had been engaged in the mob. As soon as I got down stairs I felt much better and strengthened, so that I could talk, I suppose the effects of the fresh air. When we had got near the outside of [p. 65]
being a second time mutilated or killed. Many of the mob too came around and treated me with apparent respect, and the officers and people generally looked upon me as a hostage and feared that my removal would be the signal for the rising of the mormons.
I do not remember the time that I stayed there; but I think three or four days after the murder, When with a carriage, Br. , with a Waggon, Dr. Ells and a number of others on horseback came, for the purpose of taking me to . I was very weak at the time, occasioned by loss of blood and the great discharge of my wounds, so that when Mrs. Taylor asked me if I could talk I could barely whisper, no. Quite a disscussion arose as to the propriety of my removal, the physicians and people of protesting it would be my death, whilst my friends were anxious for my removal, if possible. I suppose the former were actuated by the above named desire to keep me. Col Jones was, I believe, sincere; he had acted as a friend all the time, and he told Mrs. Taylor she ought to persuade me to not to go, for he did not believe I had strength enough to reach . It was finally agreed, however, that I should go; but as it was thought that I could not stand riding in a waggon or carriage, they prepared a litter for me, I was carried down stairs and put upon it. A number of men assisted to carry me, some of whom had been engaged in the mob. As soon as I got down stairs I felt much better and strengthened, so that I could talk, I suppose the effects of the fresh air. When we had got near the outside of [p. 65]
Page 65