Letter from Orson Hyde, 9 June 1844

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me if the subject of the memorial had been discussed by and among the people generally, and if we had obtained an expression from them favourable to the measure? If I had answerd him in the affirmative, he would [have?] immediately written home and ascertained that the people were ignorant of the move. This answer he would have received before an action would be had; and this would have thrown me into the shade, far upon the back ground of falsehood. I must therefore say unto him that it has not. I could see the drift of his mind and will give it in my own language as I cannot recollect his verbatim.
I am sent here to protect the rights of all people, and execute their wishes. If the prayers of one are granted without the knowledge of others, it would be a cause of jealousy on their part, and they would have cause to censure me for acting without their knowledge or consent. By this memorial, Congress is called to act in a matter which involves the interest and fate of the many when indeed the many have not been consulted; and how can a representative execute the wishes of the people when the people have not acquainted him with their wishes by forwarding to him their names in black and white, or at least, a respectable majority of them? It is the people that are the Sovreign and not one man. Congress, by this memorial, is called to act in a matter of general interest upon the prayer of one man <​person​>. You say that the bill is not exclusively for the Mormons, but for the Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians [p. 2]
me if the subject of the memorial had been discussed by and among the people generally, and if we had obtained an expression from them favourable to the measure? If I had answerd him in the affirmative, he would have immediately written home and ascertained that the people were ignorant of the move. This answer he would have received before an action would be had; and this would have thrown me into the shade, far upon the back ground of falsehood. I must therefore say unto him that it has not. I could see the drift of his mind and will give it in my own language as I cannot recollect his verbatim.
I am sent here to protect the rights of all people, and execute their wishes. If the prayers of one are granted without the knowledge of others, it would be a cause of jealousy on their part, and they would have cause to censure me for acting without their knowledge or consent. By this memorial, Congress is called to act in a matter which involves the interest and fate of the many when indeed the many have not been consulted; and how can a representative execute the wishes of the people when the people have not acquainted him with their wishes by forwarding to him their names in black and white, or at least, a respectable majority of them? It is the people that are the Sovreign and not one man. Congress, by this memorial, is called to act in a matter of general interest upon the prayer of one person. You say that the bill is not exclusively for the Mormons, but for the Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians [p. 2]
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