Letter from Orson Hyde, 9 June 1844

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skill and wisdom could not make “one hair white or black,” how can it be expected that I, with less skill and power, could make an impression upon the same flinty materials!! I do assure you that they are all little Matties in this respect here.
’s decission upon the unconstitutionality of that “one item” influenced my conduct <​me​> to do that which I shall probably never do again; that is, to alter the document. My reasons for doing it were these. As this appointment belongs to the Executive alone, I will erace that item, and let the bill try its luck in Congress: if it shall pass, then I will take that addressed to the executive and get his approval and Signature without that alteration, and thus between the two powers get the entire memorial passed, embracing through the Executive that “one item.” In case the bill should not pass in Congress, I still have the same opportunity to apply to the President and get his approval if possible. I have now come here with the memorial to the pres’t. entire, without alteration, and shall probably present it tomorrow. The truth of the matter was, I wanted to save the knowledge of our prophet from being impeached by Congress, by his asking a thing not constitutional, and as it was the universal opinion of all with whom I conversed that the <​bill​> would not, nor could not pass any how, I thought there could be nothing lost by eracing that part, and there might be something saved. The bill has been rejected in both houses, and now I am prepared to go to the which will be tomorrow, and when [p. 4]
skill and wisdom could not make “one hair white or black,” how can it be expected that I, with less skill and power, could make an impression upon the same flinty materials!! I do assure you that they are all little Matties in this respect here.
’s decission upon the unconstitutionality of that “one item” influenced me to do that which I shall probably never do again; that is, to alter the document. My reasons for doing it were these. As this appointment belongs to the Executive alone, I will erace that item, and let the bill try its luck in Congress: if it shall pass, then I will take that addressed to the executive and get his approval and Signature without that alteration, and thus between the two powers get the entire memorial passed, embracing through the Executive that “one item.” In case the bill should not pass in Congress, I still have the same opportunity to apply to the President and get his approval if possible. I have now come here with the memorial to the pres’t. entire, without alteration, and shall probably present it tomorrow. The truth of the matter was, I wanted to save the knowledge of our prophet from being impeached by Congress, by his asking a thing not constitutional, and as it was the universal opinion of all with whom I conversed that the bill would not, nor could not pass any how, I thought there could be nothing lost by eracing that part, and there might be something saved. The bill has been rejected in both houses, and now I am prepared to go to the which will be tomorrow, and when [p. 4]
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