Letter from Orson Hyde, 9 June 1844

  • Source Note
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After being here eight days and talking with the members, and reasoning with them, it wanted no more of a prophetic spirit to tell what Congress would do, or rather what they would not do, than it does to tell that a man’s back must be towards the South if his face is towards the North. says that it is now said in council, that it was not expected that Congress would do any thing for us. The memorials were only to tease them, and that we might as well tease them with one thing as another. If I had left home with such instructions I should never have altered a letter, but as I said before I say again, that it was in good faith that they would do something that I left home. Pursuant to that impression I went to work as industriously and prudently as possible, but instead of meeting your approbation, I have met your “decided disapprobation and indignation”. Your discernment is superior to mine, I therefore say that I am sorry that I have committed the error, and if the council will forgive this offence, I will assure them that I shall never again, under any circumstances, be inclined to take alike responsibility. If I knew of any thing more that I could say or do to give you satisfaction, I would most certainly do it.
Believing, <​therefore,​> that your magnamimity will give the foregoing reasons and explanations due consideration, I honor the vote of the council, and ask you to accept the assurances of my hearty co-operation and good-will, asking the honor to still to subscribe myself your Ob’t. Serv’t.
[p. 6]
After being here eight days and talking with the members, and reasoning with them, it wanted no more of a prophetic spirit to tell what Congress would do, or rather what they would not do, than it does to tell that a man’s back must be towards the South if his face is towards the North. says that it is now said in council, that it was not expected that Congress would do any thing for us. The memorials were only to tease them, and that we might as well tease them with one thing as another. If I had left home with such instructions I should never have altered a letter, but as I said before I say again, that it was in good faith that they would do something that I left home. Pursuant to that impression I went to work as industriously and prudently as possible, but instead of meeting your approbation, I have met your “decided disapprobation and indignation”. Your discernment is superior to mine, I therefore say that I am sorry that I have committed the error, and if the council will forgive this offence, I will assure them that I shall never again, under any circumstances, be inclined to take alike responsibility. If I knew of any thing more that I could say or do to give you satisfaction, I would most certainly do it.
Believing, therefore, that your magnamimity will give the foregoing reasons and explanations due consideration, I honor the vote of the council, and ask you to accept the assurances of my hearty co-operation and good-will, asking the honor still to subscribe myself your Ob’t. Serv’t.
[p. 6]
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