Appendix: “Outrageous Theft,” 15 February 1843 [State of Illinois v. Olney]

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OUTRAGEOUS THEFT.
On Tuesday evening last was brought before the Mayor’s court, and charged with burglary and grand larceny. The readers of the ‘Times and Seasons,’ will recollect that in the X No., Vol. 3., there was a long article written upon the nature and effects of false spirits, which was headed ‘Try the Spirits.’ Among other individuals that were mentioned as having false spirits and of being cut off from the church was . We quote the following.— has also been tried by the High Council, and disfellowshipped, because he would not have his writings tested by the word of God; evidently proving that he loves darkness rather than light, because his deeds are evil.”
Since his expulsion from the church he has been engaged in a campaign against Mormonism, and has been one of ’s right hand men; he was also one of the contributors to the filthy columns of the Sangamo Journal, making, or professing to make, a great expose of the corrupt proceedings of Mormonism. Recent developments, however, prove him to be altogether incompetent to the task, and show that he is not much better than his great compatriot in crime, , for it has been clearly proven that he is a most notorious scoundrel, and a thief. About a month ago a great excitement was created in this in consequence of ’s store having been broken into in the night, and robbed both of money and goods. About one thousand dollars worth of goods were stolen, and fifty dollars in money. The officers made dilligent search for the goods; but apparently without effect, until, through a variety of small circumstances, suspicion attached itself to ; a search warrant was issued, and the goods were found in his house; he was immediately taken prisoner, and brought before the Mayor’s court, where it was fully and satisfactorily proven that he was the thief. This he did not attempt to deny; but openly confessed the whole circumstance of the theft. A bill of Grand Larceny and Burglary was found against him, and as he did not procure bail, he was committed to the jail, to await the decision of the Circuit Court.
Since the above was sent to the compositors we have been informed that has broke loose from his keepers. This we say is very wrong, after all the trouble, anxiety, and expense of courts with their attendant witnesses, &c., and men have clearly been proven guilty, as the said evidently was, that such notorious scoundrels should be suffered to run at large.
We do not wish to attach any particular blame to the officer having him in charge, as was a large, powerful, athletic man, and as he had no prison to confine him in, he certainly had not a fair chance; he has since circulated a bill offering $50 for his apprehension, we are informed that the constable had a pair of hand cuffs made to take the prisoner to with; but they were too small, and while they were getting them altered the prisoner decamped. We shall be able to give particulars next week. One thing is evident that we need a prison. [p. [2]]
OUTRAGEOUS THEFT.
On Tuesday evening last was brought before the Mayor’s court, and charged with burglary and grand larceny. The readers of the ‘Times and Seasons,’ will recollect that in the X No., Vol. 3., there was a long article written upon the nature and effects of false spirits, which was headed ‘Try the Spirits.’ Among other individuals that were mentioned as having false spirits and of being cut off from the church was . We quote the following.— “ has also been tried by the High Council, and disfellowshipped, because he would not have his writings tested by the word of God; evidently proving that he loves darkness rather than light, because his deeds are evil.”
Since his expulsion from the church he has been engaged in a campaign against Mormonism, and has been one of ’s right hand men; he was also one of the contributors to the filthy columns of the Sangamo Journal, making, or professing to make, a great expose of the corrupt proceedings of Mormonism. Recent developments, however, prove him to be altogether incompetent to the task, and show that he is not much better than his great compatriot in crime, , for it has been clearly proven that he is a most notorious scoundrel, and a thief. About a month ago a great excitement was created in this in consequence of ’s store having been broken into in the night, and robbed both of money and goods. About one thousand dollars worth of goods were stolen, and fifty dollars in money. The officers made dilligent search for the goods; but apparently without effect, until, through a variety of small circumstances, suspicion attached itself to ; a search warrant was issued, and the goods were found in his house; he was immediately taken prisoner, and brought before the Mayor’s court, where it was fully and satisfactorily proven that he was the thief. This he did not attempt to deny; but openly confessed the whole circumstance of the theft. A bill of Grand Larceny and Burglary was found against him, and as he did not procure bail, he was committed to the jail, to await the decision of the Circuit Court.
Since the above was sent to the compositors we have been informed that has broke loose from his keepers. This we say is very wrong, after all the trouble, anxiety, and expense of courts with their attendant witnesses, &c., and men have clearly been proven guilty, as the said evidently was, that such notorious scoundrels should be suffered to run at large.
We do not wish to attach any particular blame to the officer having him in charge, as was a large, powerful, athletic man, and as he had no prison to confine him in, he certainly had not a fair chance; he has since circulated a bill offering $50 for his apprehension, we are informed that the constable had a pair of hand cuffs made to take the prisoner to with; but they were too small, and while they were getting them altered the prisoner decamped. We shall be able to give particulars next week. One thing is evident that we need a prison. [p. [2]]
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