Letter, John M. Bernhisel to Thomas Ford, 14 June 1844

  • Source Note
Page [1]
image
, June 14, 1844
To His Excellency ,
Sir,
Though I have not the honor of a personal acquaintance with you, I take the liberty of stating to you, that I arrived here from the city of about a year since, where I was engaged in the practice of medicine for many years, that Gen. [Joseph] Smith’s letter to you of this date has been read in my hearing, that the statements contained therein, in relation to the proceedings of the Municipal Authorities for the removal of the press whence issued a scandalous sheet entitled the “Nauvoo Expositor” are correct, having been an eye and ear witness of them— The whole affair was conducted by the city and his posse in the most quiet and orderly manner, without the least noise, riot or tumult, and when the nuisance was abated they <​immediately​> retired were dismissed— Having been a boarder in Gen. Smith’s family for more than nine months, and having therefore had abundent opportunities of contemplating his character, and observing his conduct, I have concluded to give you a few of my “impressions” of him— Gen. Joseph Smith is naturally a man of strong mental powers, and is possessed of much energy and decision of character, great penetration, and a profound knowledge of human nature— He is a man of calm judgement, [p. [1]]
, June 14, 1844
To His Excellency ,
Sir,
Though I have not the honor of a personal acquaintance with you, I take the liberty of stating to you, that I arrived here from the city of about a year since, where I was engaged in the practice of medicine for many years, that Gen. [Joseph] Smith’s letter to you of this date has been read in my hearing, that the statements contained therein, in relation to the proceedings of the Municipal Authorities for the removal of the press whence issued a scandalous sheet entitled the “Nauvoo Expositor” are correct, having been an eye and ear witness of them— The whole affair was conducted by the city and his posse in the most quiet and orderly manner, without the least noise, riot or tumult, and when the nuisance was abated they immediately retired were dismissed— Having been a boarder in Gen. Smith’s family for more than nine months, and having therefore had abundent opportunities of contemplating his character, and observing his conduct, I have concluded to give you a few of my “impressions” of him— Gen. Joseph Smith is naturally a man of strong mental powers, and is possessed of much energy and decision of character, great penetration, and a profound knowledge of human nature— He is a man of calm judgement, [p. [1]]
Page [1]