Book of Mormon, 1830

  • Source Note
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pruned it, and I have dunged it; and I have stretched forth mine hand almost all the day long; and the end draweth nigh. And it grieveth me that I should hew down all the trees of my vineyard, and cast them into the fire, that they should be burned. Who is it that hath corrupted my vineyard?
And it came to pass that the servant, sayeth unto his master, Is it not the loftiness of thy vineyard? Hath not the branches thereof overcame the roots, which are good? And because that the branches have overcame the roots thereof? For behold, they grew faster than the strength of the roots thereof, taking strength unto themselves. Behold, I say, Is not this the cause that the trees of thy vineyard hath become corrupted?
And it came to pass that the Lord of the vineyard sayeth unto the servant, Let us go to, and hew down the trees of the vineyard, and cast them into the fire, that they shall not cumber the ground of my vineyard; for I have done all: what could I have done more for my vineyard? But behold, the servant saith unto the Lord of the vineyard, Spare it a little longer. And the Lord saith, Yea, I will spare it a little longer: for it grieveth me that I should lose the trees of my vineyard. Wherefore, let us take of the branches of these which I have planted in the nethermost parts of my vineyard, and let us graft them into the tree from whence they came; and let us pluck from the tree, those branches whose fruit is most bitter, and graft in the natural branches of the tree, in the stead thereof. And this will I do, that the tree may not perish, that perhaps I may preserve unto myself the roots thereof, for mine own purpose. And behold, the roots of the natural branches of the tree which I planted whithersoever I would, are yet alive; wherefore, that I may preserve them also, for mine own purpose, I will take of the branches of this tree, and I will graft them in unto them. Yea, I will graft in unto them the branches of their mother tree, that I may preserve the roots also unto mine own self, that when they shall be sufficiently strong, that perhaps they may bring forth good fruit unto me, and I may yet have glory in the fruit of my vineyard.
And it came to pass that they took from the natural tree which had become wild, and grafted in unto the natural trees, which also had become wild; and they also took of the natural trees which had become wild, and grafted into their mother tree. And the Lord of the vineyard sayeth unto the servant, Pluck not the wild branches from the trees, save it be those [p. 136]
pruned it, and I have dunged it; and I have stretched forth mine hand almost all the day long; and the end draweth nigh. And it grieveth me that I should hew down all the trees of my vineyard, and cast them into the fire, that they should be burned. Who is it that hath corrupted my vineyard?
And it came to pass that the servant, sayeth unto his master, Is it not the loftiness of thy vineyard? Hath not the branches thereof overcame the roots, which are good? And because that the branches have overcame the roots thereof? For behold, they grew faster than the strength of the roots thereof, taking strength unto themselves. Behold, I say, Is not this the cause that the trees of thy vineyard hath become corrupted?
And it came to pass that the Lord of the vineyard sayeth unto the servant, Let us go to, and hew down the trees of the vineyard, and cast them into the fire, that they shall not cumber the ground of my vineyard; for I have done all: what could I have done more for my vineyard? But behold, the servant saith unto the Lord of the vineyard, Spare it a little longer. And the Lord saith, Yea, I will spare it a little longer: for it grieveth me that I should lose the trees of my vineyard. Wherefore, let us take of the branches of these which I have planted in the nethermost parts of my vineyard, and let us graft them into the tree from whence they came; and let us pluck from the tree, those branches whose fruit is most bitter, and graft in the natural branches of the tree, in the stead thereof. And this will I do, that the tree may not perish, that perhaps I may preserve unto myself the roots thereof, for mine own purpose. And behold, the roots of the natural branches of the tree which I planted whithersoever I would, are yet alive; wherefore, that I may preserve them also, for mine own purpose, I will take of the branches of this tree, and I will graft them in unto them. Yea, I will graft in unto them the branches of their mother tree, that I may preserve the roots also unto mine own self, that when they shall be sufficiently strong, that perhaps they may bring forth good fruit unto me, and I may yet have glory in the fruit of my vineyard.
And it came to pass that they took from the natural tree which had become wild, and grafted in unto the natural trees, which also had become wild; and they also took of the natural trees which had become wild, and grafted into their mother tree. And the Lord of the vineyard sayeth unto the servant, Pluck not the wild branches from the trees, save it be those [p. 136]
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