John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
Page 47
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a desire to insult us, if nothing more, by leaving us in the proximity of such men. The prevention of ’s return was among the first of their hostile movements. then went out and he also was prevented from returning. He was very angry at this; but the mob paid no attention to him; they drove him out of town, at the point of the bayonet and threatened to shoot him if he returned; he went, I am informed, to for the purpose of raising a company of men for our protection.
<​see Ac​> <​ went to after witnesses​> & it is my opinion that <​did also​> and and that when came in to us it was after his return from .
Some time after dinner we sent for some wine. It has been reported, by some; that this was taken as a sacrament. It was no such thing; our spirits were generally dull and heavy, and it was sent for to revive us. I think it was who went after it; but they would not suffer him to return. I believe we all drank of the wine & gave some to one or two of the prison guards.
We all of us felt unusually dull and languid with a remarkable depression of spirits. In consonance with those feelings I sang a song that had lately been introduced into entitled <​[ins]ert the [whol]e Song​>
“A poor wayfaring man of grief &c”
The song is pathetic and the tune quite plaintive and was very much in accordance with our feelings at the time, for our spirits were all depressed dull and gloomy and surcharged with indefinite ominous forebodings. After a lapse of some time requested me again to sing that song. I replied “ I do not feel like singing.” [p. 47]
a desire to insult us, if nothing more, by leaving us in the proximity of such men. The prevention of ’s return was among the first of their hostile movements. then went out and he also was prevented from returning. He was very angry at this; but the mob paid no attention to him; they drove him out of town, at the point of the bayonet and threatened to shoot him if he returned; he went, I am informed, to for the purpose of raising a company of men for our protection.
see Ac went to after witnesses & it is my opinion that did also and
Some time after dinner we sent for some wine. It has been reported, by some; that this was taken as a sacrament. It was no such thing; our spirits were generally dull and heavy, and it was sent for to revive us. I think it was who went after it; but they would not suffer him to return. I believe we all drank of the wine & gave some to one or two of the prison guards.
We all of us felt unusually dull and languid with a remarkable depression of spirits. In consonance with those feelings I sang a song that had lately been introduced into entitled [ins]ert the whole Song
“A poor wayfaring man of grief &c”
The song is pathetic and the tune quite plaintive and was very much in accordance with our feelings at the time, for our spirits were all depressed dull and gloomy and surcharged with indefinite ominous forebodings. After a lapse of some time requested me again to sing that song. I replied “ I do not feel like singing.” [p. 47]
Page 47