Letter, John R. Wakefield to Thomas Ford, 14 June 1844

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City June 14th 1844
Honourable Govr.
Being a stranger in the City of but fully acquainted with the facts as stated in Genl. Smith’s letter, <​June 14th​> I assert that they are true in every particular, and that the press in the minds of all unprejudiced people was a Nuisance of the worst character and that the authorities acted perfectly proper in destroying it;— and in accomplishing the act there was no noise, tumult, or riot.— Futhermore having remained for a few days <​weeks​> at Genl. Smith’s house, I think it my duty to state that I have seen nothing in his deportment but what is correct in all his domestic relations, being a a kind husband and and an affectionate father; and all his affairs both domestic and official have not only been free from censure but praiseworthy and ought to be imitated by every one deserving of good order and peace.—
Yours Sir
Most Obedently
M. D. [p. [1]]
City June 14th 1844
Honourable Govr.
Being a stranger in the City of but fully acquainted with the facts as stated in Genl. Smith’s letter, June 14th I assert that they are true in every particular, and that the press in the minds of all unprejudiced people was a Nuisance of the worst character and that the authorities acted perfectly proper in destroying it;— and in accomplishing the act there was no noise, tumult, or riot.— Futhermore having remained for a few weeks at Genl. Smith’s house, I think it my duty to state that I have seen nothing in his deportment but what is correct in all his domestic relations, being a a kind husband and and an affectionate father; and all his affairs both domestic and official have not only been free from censure but praiseworthy and ought to be imitated by every one deserving of good order and peace.—
Yours Sir
Most Obedently
M. D. [p. [1]]
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