Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of aside her boonnet and shawl but as she turned again to the stranger and beheld his look of distracted and enquiring look She was recalled to her recollection his immag[e] and person without a word a she clasped her hands in agony and <​with a piercing shriek​> fell lifeless to the floor after my son took the lifeless <​motionless​> form <​of her​> that should have been his own and placing her on a sofa resigned her into the hands of her cowering conscience smitten husband; and left her with what those pungeant feelings <​which​> some few are fated to experienc[e], but none can tell nor immagine correcly.— By the active exertions of those who attended her She at last revived to realize her lamentable <​situation​> more fully. My son returned <​and​> having heard an explanation of (the whole <​matter​> which simply <​was​> the man <​[w]ho​> detained his letters gave the intelligence of his Death) he went immediately to sea But whither he has fled or what his fate has been God knows ’tis long Since he left us and I fear my Grey hairs will go down in sorrow to grave e’re I shall see his face, <​but​> if this happens to meet the eye of the man who has brought this heavy affliction upon my boy and us (his parents) I hope it may stimulate him to <​penitence and​> better deeds hereafter.)
(Esther died short time after
I shall here drop for a while at least my s narrative and pursue the subject of my brother he <​lived single till his age of 50th year but​> continued preaching the word by land and seas untill the year 1835 when we received from him the following letter which was the last we heard of him before his death We heard no more [p. 7, bk. [1]]
aside her boonnet and shawl but as she turned again to the stranger and beheld his distracted and enquiring look She recalled to her recollection his immage and person she clasped her hands in agony and with a piercing shriek fell lifeless to the floor my son took the motionless form of her that should have been his own and placing her on a sofa resigned her into the hands of her cowering conscience smitten husband; and left her with those pungeant feelings which some few are fated to experience, but none can tell nor immagine correcly.— By the active exertions of those who attended her She at last revived to realize her lamentable situation more fully. My son returned and having heard an explanation of (the whole matter which simply was the man who detained his letters gave the intelligence of his Death) he went immediately to sea But whither he has fled or what his fate has been God knows ’tis long Since he left us and I fear my Grey hairs will go down in sorrow to grave e’re I shall see his face, but if this happens to meet the eye of the man who has brought this heavy affliction upon my boy and us (his parents) I hope it may stimulate him to penitence and better deeds hereafter.)
(Esther died short time after
I shall here drop for a while at least my s narrative and pursue the subject of my brother We heard no more [p. 7, bk. [1]]
Page 7, bk. [1]