Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [7], bk. 7
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floor <​wards​> and forwards and weeping and grieving like a tender infant untill about sunset we persuaded him to take a little nourishment. aft the next morning he went home we parted with heavy hearts for it seemed as though all our fond anticipations which we had fed upon <​and​> which had been the source of so much secret gratification to us all was in moment fled and fled forever—
I will now return and trace and give a sketch of his proceedings through the fortnight’s time that had brought to pass a train of circumstances that had swept over us like a the simoon blast— and seared our bright hopes in the tender bud ere we were granted the priviledge beholding even the opening leaf.
When he arrived at home he was not slow to exhibit the manuscript to his and family thus far he was under no condemnation his seemed highly pleased with what she heard and entered into the spirit of it so much that she gave her the priviledge of locking it up in a set of drawers which she had never <​before​> permited him to look into after he had shown the transcript to those who were priviledged to see it by his oath he laid it aside and went with to visit a relative of her’s who lived miles distant, and as his declined returning with him he left her with her friends and went home alone— shortly after he got there a very particular friend made him a visit to whom he related all he knew concerning the record The man’s curiosity was much excited and he earnestly desired to see the transcript was anxious to gratify his friend although it was contrary to his obligation, but when he went to seek for it he found that key could not be found but he soon resolved to carry his design into execution and to do this he picked the lock and in so doing he injured his lady’s beaureau considerably [p. [7], bk. 7]
wards and forwards weeping and grieving like a tender infant untill about sunset we persuaded him to take a little nourishment. the next morning he went home we parted with heavy hearts for it seemed as though all our fond anticipations which we had fed upon and which had been the source of so much secret gratification to us all was in moment fled and fled forever—
I will now return and trace and give a sketch of his proceedings through the fortnight’s time that had brought to pass a train of circumstances that had swept over us like the simoon blast— and seared our bright hopes in the tender bud ere we were granted the priviledge beholding even the opening leaf.
When he arrived at home he was not slow to exhibit the manuscript to his and family thus far he was under no condemnation his seemed highly pleased with what she heard and entered into the spirit of it so much that she gave her the priviledge of locking it up in a set of drawers which she had never before permited him to look into after he had shown the transcript to those who were priviledged to see it by his oath he laid it aside and went with to visit a relative of her’s who lived miles distant, and as his declined returning with him he left her with her friends and went home alone— shortly after he got there a very particular friend made him a visit to whom he related all he knew concerning the record The man’s curiosity was much excited and he earnestly desired to see the transcript was anxious to gratify his friend although it was contrary to his obligation, but when he went to seek for it he found that key could not be found but he resolved to carry his design into execution and to do this he picked the lock and in so doing he injured his lady’s beaureau considerably [p. [7], bk. 7]
Page [7], bk. 7