Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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hands of that faithful boy and afterwards been carefully man[a]ged as precisely according to this every plan by his brothers wh[o] survived him showing to me in every particular their faithful and affectionate remmembrance both of their Parents and the whom they loved. From all these tender recolections render our present trial doubly severe for these relies (which even were they without other value othe than that which is attached to them by these recollections are to me most precious) must now pass into the hands of wicked men who fear not God neither do they regard man, and by what right or upon what righteous principle. They never have raised a hand to earn any part of that <​of​> which they are now to reap the benefit of In consequence of these things; , we cannot make you comfortable any longer and you will be under the nescessity of taking board somewhere else for we shall have to crowd ourselves ourselves together in a log house where we shall have none of the conveinance that we have here exclaimed the young man with much feeling only let me stay with you and I can live in any log hut where you and lives but I cannot go away from you so say no more about conveinience I care not for it I can do well enough Well continued I now look around me upon all these things that have been gathered for my happiness which has cost the toil of years and <​said I now mark​> I now give it all <​this​> up for the sake of Christ and salvation and I pray God to help me to do so without one murmur or a tear and in the s[t]rength of God I give the<​m​> up from this time and I will not cast one longing look upon anything which I leave behind me
In april all ’s affairs being arranged according to his mind he and set out for The weather had for some time previous been very wet and disagreeable occasionally freezing nights this made the roads almost impassible particularly in the middle of the day but was determined not be detained by wind or weather and persvered untill they arrived at Joseph’s house although <​​> frozes his feet <​one of [his] toes​> and suffered much on the road from fatigue as well as <​​> the inclemency of the weather [p. [3], bk. 8]
hands of that faithful boy and afterwards been carefully managed precisely according to this plan by his brothers who survived him showing to me in every particular their faithful and affectionate remmembrance both of their Parents and the whom they loved. all these tender recolections render our present trial doubly severe for these relies must now pass into the hands of wicked men who fear not God neither do they regard man, and by what right or upon what righteous principle. They never have raised a hand to earn any part of that of which they are now to reap the benefit of In consequence of these things; , we cannot make you comfortable any longer and you will be under the nescessity of taking board somewhere else for we shall have to crowd ourselves together in a log house where we shall have none of the conveinance that we have here exclaimed the young man with much feeling only let me stay with you and I can live in any log hut where you and lives but I cannot go away from you so say no more about conveinience Well said I now mark I now give this up for the sake of Christ and salvation and I pray God to help me to do so without one murmur or a tear and in the strength of God I give them up from this time and I will not cast one longing look upon anything which I leave behind me
In april all ’s affairs being arranged according to his mind he and set out for The weather had for some time previous been very wet and disagreeable occasionally freezing nights this made the roads almost impassible particularly in the middle of the day but was determined not be detained by wind or weather and persvered untill they arrived at Joseph’s house although froze his one of his toes and suffered much on the road from fatigue as well as [p. [3], bk. 8]
Page [3], bk. 8