Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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a pack of devlish fools.— and to go home and mind their own business— that, if Joseph Smith had any business of that sort to attend to he was capable of doing it— and, that it would be better for them to busy themselves about that which more concerned them them. After this a quarrel arose among them, respecting who should be captain; and it ran so high that it broke up the expedition; consequently, Joseph had an opportunity of setting out unmolested; and he prosecuted the journey without meeting any of the gang.
It was agreed, that, when Joseph had had a sufficient time to transcribe the Egyptian Alphabet, after arriving at his ’s, should follow him: and that he () should take this Alphabet to the East, and call on his way on all the professed linguists in order to give them an opportunity to display their talents in giving a translation of the same. When heard of what her had in contemplation, she resolved in her heart to accompany him; but , concluding that it would be better to go without her, left quite suddenly without her knowledge, in company with my son . soon missed her , and came to me in order to ascertain whether I knew where he was. I told her what I had heard him say in regard to leaving; however, I suppressed his remarks pertaining to herself. On hearing this she became highly exasperated, and charge me with planning the whole affair. I protested against it, and delcared that I had nothing to do with the plan, or the execution of it; furthermore that the business of a house, which were <​was​> [p. 122]
a pack of devlish fools.— and to go home and mind their own business— that, if Joseph Smith had any business of that sort to attend to he was capable of doing it— and, that it would be better for them to busy themselves about that which more concerned them. After this a quarrel arose among them, respecting who should be captain; and it ran so high that it broke up the expedition; consequently, Joseph had an opportunity of setting out unmolested; and he prosecuted the journey without meeting any of the gang.
It was agreed, that, when Joseph had had a sufficient time to transcribe the Egyptian Alphabet, after arriving at his ’s, should follow him: and that he () should take this Alphabet to the East, and call on his way on all the professed linguists in order to give them an opportunity to display their talents in giving a translation of the same. When heard of what her had in contemplation, she resolved in her heart to accompany him; but , concluding that it would be better to go without her, left quite suddenly without her knowledge, in company with my son . soon missed her , and came to me in order to ascertain whether I knew where he was. I told her what I had heard him say in regard to leaving; however, I suppressed his remarks pertaining to herself. On hearing this she became highly exasperated, and charge me with planning the whole affair. I protested against it, and delcared that I had nothing to do with the plan, or the execution of it; furthermore that the business of a house, which was [p. 122]
Page 122