Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​deep​> anguish; “Oh! I have a lost my soul! I have lost my soul!!
Joseph, who had not expressed his fears till now, sprang from the table, exclaiming and exclaimed: “, have you stolen lost that manuscript? have you broken your oath and brought down condemnation upon my head, as well as your own?
“Yes, it is gone’, replied , ‘and I know not where.”
“Oh my God!” said Joseph, <​then​> clinching his hands; all is lost! all is lost! what shall I do? I have sinned; it is me <​I​> that <​who​> tempted the wrath of God; for I should have been satisfied with the first answer, which I received from the Lord— for he told me that it was not safe to let the writing go out of my possession.” He wept and groaned, and walked the floor continually.
At length he told to go back and search again. “No,’ said , “it is all in vain: I have ripped open beds and pillows; and I know it is not there.”
“Then must I,’ said Joseph, “return to my , with such a tale as this? I dare not do it lest I should kill her at once. And how shall I appear before the Lord? Of what rebuke am I not worthy from the angel of the most high?”
I besought him not to mourn so— that, perhaps the Lord world forgive him after a short season of humiliation and repentance. But what could I say to comfort him, when he saw all of the family in the same situation of mind of himself: sobs and groans, and the most bitter lamentation filled [p. 131]
deep anguish; “Oh! I have a lost my soul! I have lost my soul!!
Joseph, who had not expressed his fears till now, sprang from the table, and exclaimed: “, have you lost that manuscript? have you broken your oath and brought down condemnation upon my head, as well as your own?
“Yes, it is gone’, replied , ‘and I know not where.”
“Oh my God!” said Joseph, clinching his hands; all is lost! all is lost! what shall I do? I have sinned; it is I who tempted the wrath of God; for I should have been satisfied with the first answer, which I received from the Lord— for he told me that it was not safe to let the writing go out of my possession.” He wept and groaned, and walked the floor continually.
At length he told to go back and search again. “No,’ said , “it is all in vain: I have ripped open beds and pillows; and I know it is not there.”
“Then must I,’ said Joseph, “return with such a tale as this? I dare not do it . And how shall I appear before the Lord? Of what rebuke am I not worthy from the angel of the most high?”
I besought him not to mourn so— that, perhaps the Lord world forgive him after a short season of humiliation and repentance. But what could I say to comfort him, when he saw all of the family in the same situation of mind of himself: sobs and groans, and the most bitter lamentation filled [p. 131]
Page 131