Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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never before this allowed him even the privilege of looking into them. After showing the manuscript to those, <​to​> whom he had a right to exhibit it to, according to his oath, he went with his to visit one of her relatives, who were living some ten or fifteen miles distant. After remaining with them a short time, he returned home; but left his , as she wished to visit with her friends some longer. In a short time after he reached home, a very particular friend made him a visit. , without hestitation related all that he knew concerning the record. The curiosity of the man was much excited; and as might be expected, <​earnestly​> desired to see the manuscript. was so anxious to gratify his friend, that, although it was contrary to his obligation, he went to drawer to get <​it​>; but the key was gone. He sought for it some time, but could not find it. Being resolved, resolved however to carry his purpose into execution, he picked the lock; and in doing so considerably injured his s bureau. He then took out the manuscript, and exhibited it to this friend; after which removed it to his own set of drawers, where he could have it <​at​> his command; and passing by his oath, he showed it to any good friend that happened to call on him.
When returned, and discovered the marred state of her bureau, her irrascible temper was excited to the utmost pitch; and an intolerable storm ensued, which descended with greatest violence upon the <​devoted​> head of her .
, having once made a sacrifice of his conscience, no longer regarded its scruples; so he [p. 133]
never before this allowed him even the privilege of looking into them. After showing the manuscript to those, to whom he had a right to exhibit it , according to his oath, he went with his to visit one of her relatives, who were living some ten or fifteen miles distant. After remaining with them a short time, he returned home; but left his , as she wished to visit with her friends some longer. In a short time after he reached home, a very particular friend made him a visit. , without hestitation related all that he knew concerning the record. The curiosity of the man was much excited; and as might be expected, earnestly desired to see the manuscript. was so anxious to gratify his friend, that, although it was contrary to his obligation, he went to drawer to get it; but the key was gone. He sought for it some time, but could not find it. Being resolved, however to carry his purpose into execution, he picked the lock; and in doing so considerably injured his s bureau. He then took out the manuscript, and exhibited it to this friend; after which removed it to his own set of drawers, where he could have it at his command; and passing by his oath, he showed it to any good friend that happened to call on him.
When returned, and discovered the marred state of her bureau, her irrascible temper was excited to the utmost pitch; and an intolerable storm ensued, which descended with greatest violence upon the devoted head of her .
, having once made a sacrifice of his conscience, no longer regarded its scruples; so he [p. 133]
Page 133