Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 170
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he stopped at a number of places in order to sell his books; but was turned out of doors, as soon as he declared his principles. When evening came on, he was faint and almost indisposed discouraged; but coming to an inn which was surrounded with every appearance of plenty, he called to see if the Landlord would buy one of his books. On going in, he enquired of him if he did not wish to purchase a history of the origen of the Indians.
“I do not know,” replied the Host, “how did you get hold of it,”
“It was translated,” rejoined “by my brother, from some gold plates that he found buried in the Earth.”
“You d—md liar!” cried the Landlord, “get out of my house— you shant stay one minute with your books.”
was sick at heart; for this was the 5th time he had been turned out of doors that day. He left the house and travelled a short distance, and washed his feet in a small brook, as a testimony against him. He then proceeded on his journey 5 miles farther; and seeing an apple tree a short distance from the road, he concluded to pass the night under it: and here he lay all night upon the cold damp ground. In the morning he arose from his comfortless bed, and observing a small cottage at no great distance, from the he drew near hoping to get a little refreshment. The only inmate was a widow who seemed very poor. He asked her for food relating the story of his former treatment. She prepared, him some victuals; and after eating, he explained to her the history of the book of Mormon. She listened attentively, and believed all that he told her; but in consequence of her poverty, she was unable to purchase one one <​of​> his books. He presented her one and proceeded to [illegible] Bloomington, which was eight miles farther. Here he stopped at the [p. 170]
he stopped at a number of places in order to sell his books; but was turned out of doors, as soon as he declared his principles. When evening came on, he was faint and almost discouraged; but coming to an inn which was surrounded with every appearance of plenty, he called to see if the Landlord would buy one of his books. On going in, he enquired of him if he did not wish to purchase a history of the origen of the Indians.
“I do not know,” replied the Host, “how did you get hold of it,”
“It was translated,” rejoined “by my brother, from some gold plates that he found buried in the Earth.”
“You d—md liar!” cried the Landlord, “get out of my house— you shant stay one minute with your books.”
was sick at heart; for this was the 5th time he had been turned out of doors that day. He left the house and travelled a short distance, and washed his feet in a small brook, as a testimony against him. He then proceeded on his journey 5 miles farther; and seeing an apple tree a short distance from the road, he concluded to pass the night under it: and here he lay all night upon the cold damp ground. In the morning he arose from his comfortless bed, and observing a small cottage at no great distance, he drew near hoping to get a little refreshment. The only inmate was a widow who seemed very poor. He asked her for food relating the story of his former treatment. She prepared, him some victuals; and after eating, he explained to her the history of the book of Mormon. She listened attentively, and believed all that he told her; but in consequence of her poverty, she was unable to purchase one of his books. He presented her one and proceeded to Bloomington, which was eight miles farther. Here he stopped at the [p. 170]
Page 170