Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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entered the house he cried out, in amazement, “Lovisa is dead and her spirit is now come to warn me of my sudden departure from this world.” “No, father, she exclaimed, “God has raised me up, and I have come to tell you to prepare for death” She conversed an hour or so with him; then, with the assistance of her husband and those who were tending tended upon her that night, she crossed the street back again to her own apartment.
When this was noised abroad a great multitude of people came together, both to hear and see concerning the strange and marvelous circumstance of which they had heard. She talked to them a short time, and then dismissed them; promising, to meet them the next day at the village church, where she would tell them all about the strange manner in which she was had <​been​> healed.
The following day, according to promise, she proceeded to the meeting house; and when she arrived there a large congregation had collected. Soon after she entered the house, the minister arose, and remarked as follows: that, as many of the congregation had doubtless come to hear a recital of the strange circumstance which had taken place in the neighborhood, and as he himself felt more interested in it, than in hearing a gospel discourse, he would open the meeting, then give place to Mrs. Tuttle. The minister then requestsed her to sing a hymn; she accordingly did so, and her voice was as high and clear as it had ever been. Having sung, she arose and addressed the audience as follows: “I seemed to be borne away to the world of spirits, where I saw the Savior, as though a vail [p. 13]
entered the house he cried out, in amazement, “Lovisa is dead and her spirit is now come to warn me of my sudden departure from this world.” “No, father, she exclaimed, “God has raised me up, and I have come to tell you to prepare for death” She conversed an hour or so with him; then, with the assistance of her husband and those who tended upon her that night, she crossed the street back again to her own apartment.
When this was noised abroad a great multitude of people came together, both to hear and see concerning the strange and marvelous circumstance of which they had heard. She talked to them a short time, and then dismissed them; promising, to meet them the next day at the village church, where she would tell them all about the strange manner in which she had been healed.
The following day, according to promise, she proceeded to the meeting house; and when she arrived there a large congregation had collected. Soon after she entered , the minister arose, and remarked as follows: that, as many of the congregation had doubtless come to hear a recital of the strange circumstance which had taken place in the neighborhood, and as he himself felt more interested in it, than in hearing a gospel discourse, he would open the meeting, then give place to Mrs. Tuttle. The minister then requestsed her to sing a hymn; she accordingly did so, and her voice was as high and clear as it had ever been. Having sung, she arose and addressed the audience as follows: “I seemed to be borne away to the world of spirits, where I saw the Savior, as though a vail [p. 13]
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