Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 196
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travelling expenses; but those, from whom they expected the most assistance, disappointed them; consequently, the bur then was thrown entirely upon my shoulders. From this time forwards, I furnished the whole 50 persons with food from day to day.
I soon discovered among the sisters mothers a kind of carelessness with regard to their children; even when their lives were in danger. So I called them together, and endevored to impress upon their minds; the importance of doing their duty to their children; and, in such a place as this especially, they ought to keep them constantly by their side; that they should consider that children were given to them for a blessing; and, if they did not treat them as such, they would be taken from them. Still, they were negligent; and excused themselves, by saying that their children were disobeidient. I told the sisters that I could manage their children; and if they were not better controlled by their Mothers I should take the controll of them. I then called the children around me, and said to them “Now children mark what I say to you: when I come up the stairs, and raise my hand, you must every one of you run to me as fast as you can.— Will you do as I tell you?” Yes they replied with one unanimous voice. And they strictly kept their faith to the end of the journey.
One getting about half way to , the canal broke. This gave rise to much murmuring and discontentment; which they expressed in terms like the following:
“Well the canal is broke now, and here we are; and here we are like to be, for we can go no farther. We have left our homes, and here we have no means getting a living; an and consequently we shall have to starve.
“No, No;” siad I you will not starve, brethren, nor any thing of the kind; only do be patient, and stop [p. 196]
travelling expenses; but those, from whom they expected the most assistance, disappointed them; consequently, the bur then was thrown entirely upon my shoulders. From this time forward, I furnished the whole 50 persons with food from day to day.
I soon discovered among the mothers a kind of carelessness with regard to their children; even when their lives were in danger. So I called them together, and endevored to impress upon their minds; the importance of doing their duty to their children; and, in such a place as this especially, they ought to keep them constantly by their side; that they should consider that children were given to them for a blessing; and, if they did not treat them as such, they would be taken from them. Still, they were negligent; and excused themselves, by saying that their children were disobeidient. I told the sisters that I could manage their children; and if they were not better controlled by their Mothers I should take the controll of them. I then called the children around me, and said to them “Now children mark what I say to you: when I come up stairs, and raise my hand, you must every one of you run to me as fast as you can.— Will you do as I tell you?” Yes they replied with one unanimous voice. And they strictly kept their faith to the end of the journey.
On getting about half way to , the canal broke. This gave rise to much murmuring and discontentment; which they expressed in terms like the following:
“Well the canal is broke now, and here we are; and here we are like to be, for we can go no farther. We have left our homes, and here we have no means getting a living; and consequently we shall have to starve.
“No, No;” siad I you will not starve, brethren, nor any thing of the kind; only do be patient, and stop [p. 196]
Page 196