Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of militia to which my brother belonged in order to take therefrom such as were but qualified to do military duty. My brother, being very anxious to go into the army at this time, was so fearful that he, would be passed by on account of his age, that the sweat stood in large drops of sweat stood on his face, and he shook like an aspen leaf. As luck would have it, the officer made choice of him among others; and he entered the army; and continued in the services of his until he was seventeen. During this time he was in many battles, both on land and sea. And several times narrowly escaped death by famine; but, according to his own account, whenever he was brought into a situation to fully realize his entire dependence upon God, the hand of Providence was always manifested in his deliverance.
Not long since, I met with an acquaintance of my brother; I requested him to furnish me such facts as were in his possession concerning him (Stephen), and he wrote the following brief, yet comprehensive account, for the gratification of my readers:—
 
“I, Horace Stanly, was born in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont, Aug. 21st 1798. I have been personally acquainted with Maj. <​Col.​> Mack and his family ever since I can remember, as I lived in the same Township within one mile and a half of the major’s <​Col’s​> farm, and two miles from his store at a place called [blank] which is eight miles from Chelsea, the County seat of ; where he conducted the merchantile and tinning business. My eldest brother went to learn the tinnery business of the Major’s <​Col’s​> workmen. The Maj. <​Col.​> being a man [p. 20]
of militia to which my brother belonged in order to take therefrom such as were but qualified to do military duty. My brother, being very anxious to go into the army at this time, was so fearful that he, would be passed by on account of his age, that large drops of sweat stood on his face, and he shook like an aspen leaf. As luck would have it, the officer made choice of him among others; and he entered the army; and continued in the services of his until he was seventeen. During this time he was in many battles, both on land and sea. And several times narrowly escaped death by famine; but, according to his own account, whenever he was brought into a situation to fully realize his entire dependence upon God, the hand of Providence was always manifested in his deliverance.
Not long since, I met with an acquaintance of my brother; I requested him to furnish me such facts as were in his possession concerning him (Stephen), and he wrote the following brief, yet comprehensive account, for the gratification of my readers:—
 
“I, Horace Stanly, was born in Tunbridge, Orange County, Vermont, Aug. 21st 1798. I have been personally acquainted with Col. Mack and his family ever since I can remember, as I lived in the same Township within one mile and a half of the Col’s farm, and two miles from his store at a place called [blank] which is eight miles from Chelsea, the County seat of ; where he conducted the merchantile and tinning business. My eldest brother went to learn the tinnery business of the Col’s workmen. The Col. being a man [p. 20]
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