Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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— I have always believed you before; but I cannot see any prospect of this prophecy being fulfilled; but if it is so I will never dispute your word again.” I asked him if he would stay in long enough to prove my saying, whether they be true or false.” he promised to do so. They soon afterwards left the house in order to get farther information upon the subject.
After falling asleep that night I saw my sons in vision: they were upon the prarie travelling, and seemed very tired and hungry— they had but one horse— I saw them stop and tie him to the stub of a burnt sapling, then lay down upon the ground to rest themselves; and they looked so pale and faint that it distressed me— I sprang up, and said to my : “Oh I can See Joseph and , and they are so weak they can scarcely stand— Now they are lying asleep on the cold ground! Oh how I wish that I could give them something to eat!
begged me to be quiet, saying, that I was nervous. But it was impossible for me to rest— they were still before my eyes.— I could saw them lay there two full hours; then one of them went away to get something to eat, but not succeeding, they traveled now on.— This time rode, and Joseph walked by his side, holding himself up by the stirup leather. I saw him reel with weakness, but could render him no assistance— My soul was grieved,— I rose from my bed, and spent the remainder of the night in walking the floor.
The next day I made preparations to receive my sons; confident that the poor afflicted wanderers would arive at home before sunset. Some time in the afternoon and I were coming down stairs— She was before me: when she came to the bottom of the stairsLucy steps, she sprang froward, [p. 290]
— I have always believed you before; but I cannot see any prospect of this prophecy being fulfilled; but if it is so I will never dispute your word again.” I asked him if he would stay in long enough to prove my saying, whether they be true or false.” he promised to do so. They soon afterwards left the house in order to get farther information upon the subject.
After falling asleep that night I saw my sons in vision: they were upon the prarie travelling, and seemed very tired and hungry— they had but one horse— I saw them stop and tie him to the stub of a burnt sapling, then lay down upon the ground to rest themselves; and they looked so pale and faint that it distressed me— I sprang up, and said to my : “Oh I can See Joseph and , and they are so weak they can scarcely stand— Now they are lying asleep on the cold ground! Oh how I wish that I could give them something to eat!
begged me to be quiet, saying, that I was nervous. But it was impossible for me to rest— they were still before my eyes.— I saw them lay there two full hours; then one of them went away to get something to eat, but not succeeding, they traveled on.— This time rode, and Joseph walked by his side, holding himself up by the stirup leather. I saw him reel with weakness, but could render him no assistance— My soul was grieved,— I rose from my bed, and spent the remainder of the night in walking the floor.
The next day I made preparations to receive my sons; confident that the poor afflicted wanderers would arive at home before sunset. Some time in the afternoon and I were coming down stairs— She was before me: when she came to the bottom of the Lucy steps, she sprang froward, [p. 290]
Page 290