Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 325
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to the next ferry; finding, that there was no boat here, and, that in the next nieghborhood, as man’s brains were beat out for being a Mormon, we returned to the first ferry, and tried hallooing to raise the ferryman on the opposite side of the river; but were not able to wake him. We were almost benum[b]ed with the cold;— to warm ourselves we commenced scuffling and jumpping— we then beat our feet upon the logs and stumps in order to start a circulation of the blood; but at last Cousin became so cold and sleepy, that he said he could not stand it any longer, and laid down. I told him he was freezing to death— I rolled him on the ground, pounded, and thumped him:— I then cut a stick, and said I would thrash him. At this he got up and undertook to thrash me— This stirred his blood a little; but he soon laid down again; however, the ferryman in a short time came over, and set us on our own side of the river. We then travelled on until about breakfast time, when we stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned was senator Ashby, that commanded the mob at . That night we stayed at one of the bitterest of mobocrats, by the name of Fox; and started the next morning without breakfast. Our rout lay through a wild prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house in 40 miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces, and the ground was <​so​> slippery that we could scarcely keep our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity, we lost our way. Soon after which I became [p. 325]
to the next ferry; finding, that there was no boat here, and, that in the next nieghborhood, a man’s brains were beat out for being a Mormon, we returned to the first ferry, and tried hallooing to raise the ferryman on the opposite side of the river; but were not able to wake him. We were almost benumbed with the cold;— to warm ourselves we commenced scuffling and jumpping— we then beat our feet upon the logs and stumps in order to start a circulation of the blood; but at last Cousin became so cold and sleepy, that he said he could not stand it any longer, and laid down. I told him he was freezing to death— I rolled him on the ground, pounded, and thumped him:— I then cut a stick, and said I would thrash him. At this he got up and undertook to thrash me— This stirred his blood a little; but he soon laid down again; however, the ferryman in a short time came over, and set us on our own side of the river. We then travelled on until about breakfast time, when we stopped at the house of a man, who, we afterwards learned was senator Ashby, that commanded the mob at . That night we stayed at one of the bitterest of mobocrats, by the name of Fox; and started the next morning without breakfast. Our rout lay through a wild prairie, where there was but very little track, and only one house in 40 miles. The north-west wind blew fiercely in our faces, and the ground was so slippery that we could scarcely keep our feet, and when the night came on, to add to our perplexity, we lost our way. Soon after which I became [p. 325]
Page 325