Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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cattle, roaring animals, rose up on every side in the most threatening manner possible; tearing the earth, tossing their horns, and bellowing in the most terrifick manner, all around me. They finally came so close upon me, that I was compelled to drop the Box, and fly for my life;— yet, in the midst of all this terror, I was perfectly happy; though I awoke, trembling with fear.”
From this forward my seemed more confirmed than ever in the opinion: that there were no order or class of religionists who knew any more concerning the Kingdom of God, than those of the world; or such as made no profession of religion whatever.
In 1811, we moved from Royalton <​Vermont​> to Lebanon <​New Hampshire​>. And shortly after we arrived in the here latter place, my had another very singular Vision; which I is as follows:
“I thought,” said he, “I was travelling in an open desolate field, which appeared to be very barren; and while thus travelling, the thought suddenly came into my mind, that I had better stop and reflect upon what I was doing before I went any farther. So I asked myself, what motive can I have in travelling here, and what place can this be? My guide who stood by me, said; ‘this is the desolate world; but travel on.’ The road was so broad and barren, that I wondered why I shall should travel in it; for, said I to myself, broad is the road, and wide is the gate that leads to death, and many there be that walk therein; but narrow is the way, and straight is the gate that leads to everlasting Life, and few there be that go in thereat.” I travelled a short distance farther, and came to a narrow path; I entered it, and traveling a short proceeding some distance farther, beheld a beautiful stream of water, which ran from the east to the west. Of this stream, I could see neither the source nor the outlet <​its mouth​>; but [p. 53]
cattle, roaring animals, rose up on every side in the most threatening manner possible; tearing the earth, tossing their horns, and bellowing in the most terrifick manner, all around me. They finally came so close upon me, that I was compelled to drop the Box, and fly for my life;— yet, in the midst of all this terror, I was perfectly happy; though I awoke, trembling with fear.”
From this forward my seemed more confirmed than ever in the opinion: that there were no order or class of religionists who knew any more concerning the Kingdom of God, than those of the world; or such as made no profession of religion whatever.
In 1811, we moved from Royalton Vermont to Lebanon New Hampshire. And shortly after we arrived here , my had another very singular Vision; which is as follows:
“I thought,” said he, “I was travelling in an open desolate field, which appeared to be very barren; and while thus travelling, the thought suddenly came into my mind, that I had better stop and reflect upon what I was doing before I went any farther. So I asked myself, what motive can I have in travelling here, and what place can this be? My guide who stood by me, said; ‘this is the desolate world; but travel on.’ The road was so broad and barren, that I wondered why I should travel in it; for, said I to myself, broad is the road, and wide is the gate that leads to death, and many there be that walk therein; but narrow is the way, and straight is the gate that leads to everlasting Life, and few there be that go in thereat.” I travelled a short distance farther, and came to a narrow path; I entered it, and proceeding some farther, beheld a beautiful stream of water, which ran from the east to the west. Of this stream, I could see neither the source nor its mouth; but [p. 53]
Page 53