Minutes, 22 July 1842

  • Source Note
Page 869
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At a meeting of the citizens of the city of held in said city at the meeting ground, July 22d 1842.
Esq. was called to the chair, and Gustavus Hills was appointed clerk.
The meeting was called to order by the chairman, who stated the object of the meeting to be to obtain an expression of the public mind in reference to the reports gone abroad, calumniating the character of Pres. Joseph Smith. Gen. then rose and presented the following resolution.
Resolved—That, having heard that was circulating many base falsehoods respecting a number of the citizens of , and especially against our worthy and respected Mayor, Joseph Smith, we do hereby manifest to the world that so far as we are acquainted with Joseph Smith we know him to be a good, moral, virtuous, peaceable and patriotic man, and a firm supporter of law, justice and equal rights; that he at all times upholds and keeps inviolate the constitution of this and of the .
A vote was then called and the resolution adopted by a large concourse of citizens, numbering somewhere about a thousand men. Two or three, voted in the negative.
Elder then rose and spoke at some length in explanation of his negative vote. Pres. Joseph Smith spoke in reply—
Question to , ‘Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way?’ Answer, by Elder , ‘Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.’
Elder responded at some length. Elder then spoke in reply, and was followed by Elders and Pres. . Several others spoke bearing testimony of the iniquity of those who had calumniated Pres. J. Smith’s character.
Meeting adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Meeting assembled pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the .
A petition was then received from a committee appointed by the city council for the reception, approbation, and signatures of the citizens generally, petitioning the of for protection in our peaceable rights, which was read approved, and signed by, 8,00 persons.
ESQ., Chairman.
Gustavus Hills, Clerk.
The “Ladies Relief Society,” also drew up a petition signed by about one thousand Ladies speaking in the highest terms of the virtue, philanthrophy, and benevolence of Joseph Smith; begging that he might not be injured, and that they and their families might have the privilege of enjoying their peaceable rights. A petition was also drawn up by many citizens in, and near , who were not Mormons, setting forth the same things. [p. 869]
At a meeting of the citizens of the city of held in said city at the meeting ground, July 22d 1842.
Esq. was called to the chair, and Gustavus Hills was appointed clerk.
The meeting was called to order by the chairman, who stated the object of the meeting to be to obtain an expression of the public mind in reference to the reports gone abroad, calumniating the character of Pres. Joseph Smith. Gen. then rose and presented the following resolution.
Resolved—That, having heard that was circulating many base falsehoods respecting a number of the citizens of , and especially against our worthy and respected Mayor, Joseph Smith, we do hereby manifest to the world that so far as we are acquainted with Joseph Smith we know him to be a good, moral, virtuous, peaceable and patriotic man, and a firm supporter of law, justice and equal rights; that he at all times upholds and keeps inviolate the constitution of this and of the .
A vote was then called and the resolution adopted by a large concourse of citizens, numbering somewhere about a thousand men. Two or three, voted in the negative.
Elder then rose and spoke at some length in explanation of his negative vote. Pres. Joseph Smith spoke in reply—
Question to , ‘Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way?’ Answer, by Elder , ‘Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.’
Elder responded at some length. Elder then spoke in reply, and was followed by Elders and Pres. . Several others spoke bearing testimony of the iniquity of those who had calumniated Pres. J. Smith’s character.
Meeting adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Meeting assembled pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the .
A petition was then received from a committee appointed by the city council for the reception, approbation, and signatures of the citizens generally, petitioning the of for protection in our peaceable rights, which was read approved, and signed by, 8,00 persons.
ESQ., Chairman.
Gustavus Hills, Clerk.
The “Ladies Relief Society,” also drew up a petition signed by about one thousand Ladies speaking in the highest terms of the virtue, philanthrophy, and benevolence of Joseph Smith; begging that he might not be injured, and that they and their families might have the privilege of enjoying their peaceable rights. A petition was also drawn up by many citizens in, and near , who were not Mormons, setting forth the same things. [p. 869]
Page 869