Times and Seasons, 1 July 1842

  • Source Note
Page 837
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In the evening, at eight o’clock, the weather was stormy, and every thing seemed to indicate an abundance of rain.
The hopes we entertained yesterday have not been realized. On Wednesday, we were awoke at a few minutes before five in the morning by another earthquake.
During these latter days it appears to us as if the earth on which we were walking was constantly quaking.
Saint Marc.—A letter from this town, which has been communicated to us, informs us that there, too, the earthquake of Saturday last was felt with the greatest violence; many houses have been so much shaken that they threaten every instant to fall down. On some plantations in the neighborhood of the town very great damage has been done.
Gonaives, 8th May.—Yesterday afternoon an earthquake was felt in this city, which was so violent that most of the houses in it were thrown down. At the same time, in consequence of the shock, a fire broke out in the apothecary’s shop of Mr. Invernezzes and consumed in a few moments an entire block. The flames destroyed every thing that came in their way; there was not a drop of water in the town.
All the houses which have not been burnt down have been injured by the earthquakes, and this morning the shocks occur every quarter of an hour. The shops of Madame John Jouffertts and M Dupy have fallen a prey to the flames. The shops of M. Richard Dauphin and M. Oster, built of stone and brick, have fallen down. Houses and shops are inaccessible, and we write these hurried lines in the street. The whole population has passed the night in the middle of the streets. Of the merchandize, which the merchants had been obliged to pile up in the public square, a great part has been stolen. It is impossible at present to estimate the extent of the loss The church, the prison, the national palace, the treasury, the arsenal, and the house which was getting ready for the colonel commanding this district, are now nothing more than a heap of ruins.
In short no one has escaped the calamity. Now, while we are writing, the fire is entirely extinguished, but the sky looks threatening, and we are afraid of more shocks. If unfortunately our fears should be realized, there will be an end of the few houses remaining standing, and Gonaives will be no more.
The first and principle shock lasted about five minutes and was followed during the night by more than twenty others which, though not so violent, were equally fearful.
It is now 8 o’clock in the morning. Not half an hour has passed since we had another violent shock. The number of persons killed and wounded is not yet known. All the prisoners who were not buried under the ruins of the prison, have escaped. God grant that the Capital may not have been afflicted with a similar misfortune;
Cape Haytien, Wednesday, 6 o’clock in the evening.—Most deplorable news is spreading throughout the city. It has been brought by Mr. Obas, son of the general commanding the district of Plaisance. In consequence of the earthquake which was felt here on Saturday evning, Cape Town has entirely disappeared and with it two-thirds of the population. The families which escaped this disaster have taken refuge at La Fosette, where they are without shelter, clothes or provisions.
Such is the news circulating in town, and which unfortunately is probably too true. It is to be hoped, however, it will not be confirmed in its full extent.
It is said that the President of Hayti has given orders to the physicians and officers of health attached to the hospital, to set off this evening and give their assistance to the unfortunate victims of this disaster.
Capt. Morris (of the brig Wm. Nelson, which brings the account) states in addition, that a few hours previous to his departure, a courier arrived with information that at Cape Haytien a fire succeeded the earthquake, destroying the remaining houses, the powder magazine, and the remnant of the inhabitants. St. Nicholas and Port Paix are said to be in ruins, and in fact all the towns on the north side of the island. One inhabitant of the Cape, a Mr. Dupuy, was saved, all the rest being either crushed, or drowned by the sea, which rose and submerged the city. Fearful; fearful, indeed, are the particulars of this awful visitation.
Cape Haytien, known as The Cape or Cape Francois, on the north coast, is the [p. 837]
In the evening, at eight o’clock, the weather was stormy, and every thing seemed to indicate an abundance of rain.
The hopes we entertained yesterday have not been realized. On Wednesday, we were awoke at a few minutes before five in the morning by another earthquake.
During these latter days it appears to us as if the earth on which we were walking was constantly quaking.
Saint Marc.—A letter from this town, which has been communicated to us, informs us that there, too, the earthquake of Saturday last was felt with the greatest violence; many houses have been so much shaken that they threaten every instant to fall down. On some plantations in the neighborhood of the town very great damage has been done.
Gonaives, 8th May.—Yesterday afternoon an earthquake was felt in this city, which was so violent that most of the houses in it were thrown down. At the same time, in consequence of the shock, a fire broke out in the apothecary’s shop of Mr. Invernezzes and consumed in a few moments an entire block. The flames destroyed every thing that came in their way; there was not a drop of water in the town.
All the houses which have not been burnt down have been injured by the earthquakes, and this morning the shocks occur every quarter of an hour. The shops of Madame John Jouffertts and M Dupy have fallen a prey to the flames. The shops of M. Richard Dauphin and M. Oster, built of stone and brick, have fallen down. Houses and shops are inaccessible, and we write these hurried lines in the street. The whole population has passed the night in the middle of the streets. Of the merchandize, which the merchants had been obliged to pile up in the public square, a great part has been stolen. It is impossible at present to estimate the extent of the loss The church, the prison, the national palace, the treasury, the arsenal, and the house which was getting ready for the colonel commanding this district, are now nothing more than a heap of ruins.
In short no one has escaped the calamity. Now, while we are writing, the fire is entirely extinguished, but the sky looks threatening, and we are afraid of more shocks. If unfortunately our fears should be realized, there will be an end of the few houses remaining standing, and Gonaives will be no more.
The first and principle shock lasted about five minutes and was followed during the night by more than twenty others which, though not so violent, were equally fearful.
It is now 8 o’clock in the morning. Not half an hour has passed since we had another violent shock. The number of persons killed and wounded is not yet known. All the prisoners who were not buried under the ruins of the prison, have escaped. God grant that the Capital may not have been afflicted with a similar misfortune;
Cape Haytien, Wednesday, 6 o’clock in the evening.—Most deplorable news is spreading throughout the city. It has been brought by Mr. Obas, son of the general commanding the district of Plaisance. In consequence of the earthquake which was felt here on Saturday evning, Cape Town has entirely disappeared and with it two-thirds of the population. The families which escaped this disaster have taken refuge at La Fosette, where they are without shelter, clothes or provisions.
Such is the news circulating in town, and which unfortunately is probably too true. It is to be hoped, however, it will not be confirmed in its full extent.
It is said that the President of Hayti has given orders to the physicians and officers of health attached to the hospital, to set off this evening and give their assistance to the unfortunate victims of this disaster.
Capt. Morris (of the brig Wm. Nelson, which brings the account) states in addition, that a few hours previous to his departure, a courier arrived with information that at Cape Haytien a fire succeeded the earthquake, destroying the remaining houses, the powder magazine, and the remnant of the inhabitants. St. Nicholas and Port Paix are said to be in ruins, and in fact all the towns on the north side of the island. One inhabitant of the Cape, a Mr. Dupuy, was saved, all the rest being either crushed, or drowned by the sea, which rose and submerged the city. Fearful; fearful, indeed, are the particulars of this awful visitation.
Cape Haytien, known as The Cape or Cape Francois, on the north coast, is the [p. 837]
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