Edward Partridge, History, Manuscript, circa 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of making a show of legality for what they did.
during the night collected <​together​> a hundred or more of the saints, they <​who​> were <​but​> poorly armed some having nothing but clubs, and marched them on the road to<​wards​> town calculating <​expecting​> to stop at the camp of the saints near town but hearing of <​the release of the prisoners and of​> the agreement <​of the brn.​> to leave the and <​also that the militia had been <​were was​> called out​> the excitement produced at <​to make peace​> in consequence of his Co. before he had got near <​had reached​> the brns <​settlement​> he turned aside his men into the woods and concluding to disperse and go home— News flew to town that with a co. of his brn. were marching towards that place this <​so​> enraged and his pretended militia that they he demanded <​that & his Co. should give up their arms <​& that​>​> those men <​who were in the battle the day before should​> to be given up to be tried for murder and also that and his Co. should give up their arms <​saying that​> if they did <​would do​> those things they should be saf[e]ly protected in removing out of the otherwise there was no peace for them
and his men reluctan[t]ly consented to these propositions but were persuaded finally <​They reluctan[t]ly consented to those propositions and were it not for the fear of resisting the authorities they would sooner <​have​> shed their blood in defence of their rights than to have submitted to such oppression​> <​however the arms were given up​> <​and​> gave up their arms amounting to about 50 guns, one pistol & 1 sword & A number <​of those who​> that were in the battle delivered themselves up as prisoners and The saints <​now​> made all possible exertion to leave the was the principal instrument with the militia in making <​receiving​> these last proposals and getting them consented to
After detain[in]g the prisoners a day and night and pretending to try them for murder also threatening & brickbatting them took them into a cornfield so that their lives might not be in danger from his pretended militia and <​after​> taking a watch from one of them for costs as he was constable said to them “clear”
— promised to give back the arms <​whenever the saints​> they left the this he afterwards refused to do <​whereupon​> the ’s order was twice obtaind for them but he would not obey him it neither have they ever been paid for. Tuesday <​Wednesday​> Nov. 6 Having taken so many arms, the mob now felt safe, they were no longer militia The saints concluded to concluded that it woul to go south into Van Buren Co. which was consented to by a number of leading men, but before night word was sent to them that they must not <​might​> go west or South but <​North and east otherwise​> they would meet with trouble. Wednesday Nov 6th The arms being taken from the Saints the mob now felt safe and were no longer militia they formed themselves into companies and went forth on horseback armed to harrass the saints and pick up all the arms they could find. Two of these companies were headed by [p. [13]]
of making a show of legality for what they did.
during the night collected together a hundred or more of the saints, who were but poorly armed some having nothing but clubs, and marched them on the road towards town calculating expecting to stop at the camp of the saints near town but hearing of the release of the prisoners and of the agreement of the brn. to leave the and also that the militia was called out at to make peace before he had had reached the brns settlement he turned aside his men into the woods concluding to disperse and go home— News flew to town that with a co. of his brn. were marching towards that place this so enraged and his pretended militia that he demanded that & his Co. should give up their arms & that those men who were in the battle the day before should be given up to be tried for murder saying that if they would do those things they should be safely protected in removing out of the otherwise there was no peace for them
and his men reluctantly consented to these propositions They reluctantly consented to those propositions and were it not for the fear of resisting the authorities they would sooner have shed their blood in defence of their rights than to have submitted to such oppression however the arms were given up gave up their arms amounting to about 50 guns, one pistol & 1 sword & A number of those who were in the battle delivered themselves up as prisoners The saints now made all possible exertion to leave the
After detaining the prisoners a day and night and pretending to try them for murder also threatening & brickbatting them took them into a cornfield so that their lives might not be in danger from his pretended militia and after taking a watch from one of them for costs as he was constable said to them “clear”
— promised to give back the arms whenever the saints left the this he afterwards refused to do whereupon the ’s order was twice obtaind for them but he would not obey it neither have they ever been paid for. The saints concluded concluded to go south into Van Buren Co. which was consented to by a number of leading men, but before night word was sent to them that they might go North and east otherwise they would meet with trouble. Wednesday Nov 6th The arms being taken from the Saints the mob now felt safe and were no longer militia they formed themselves into companies and went forth on horseback armed to harrass the saints and pick up all the arms they could find. Two of these companies were headed by [p. [13]]
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