John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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that we were about to appeal to the law for redress, they became very angry, and again commenced hostilities. The Mormons then began to prepare for self defence, but were badly armed. The citizens would collect together and by night commit depredations on the Mormons, by puttings pulling down their houses, whipping the men, &c., untill sometime about the fourth of November, 1833, a conflict took place, in which three of four persons were killed and others wounded. This took place above Blue, eight or nine miles from , and the news reach[e]d a little after dark, at which time six or eight of the Mormons were undergoing a sham trial under a pretence of law; but this news produced such confusion in the , and the people became so angry, that the court was obliged to shut up the prisioners in the court Jail to keep them from being murdered. The people continued to gather from different parts of the , and such was the wrath and determination manifested, that before light the next morning, the Mormon leaders agreed for themselves and the church, to leave the . , who lived above Blue, eight or ten miles distance, on hearing that several Mormons were in Jail without just cause, and supposing they intended to take their lives, gathered up some one hundred and fifty men [p. 30]
that we were about to appeal to the law for redress, they became very angry, and again commenced hostilities. The Mormons then began to prepare for self defence, but were badly armed. The citizens would collect together and by night commit depredations on the Mormons, by pulling down their houses, whipping the men, &c., until sometime about the fourth of November, 1833, a conflict took place, in which three of four persons were killed and others wounded. This took place above Blue, eight or nine miles from , and the news reached a little after dark, at which time six or eight of the Mormons were undergoing a sham trial under a pretence of law; but this news produced such confusion in the , and the people became so angry, that the court was obliged to shut up the prisioners in the Jail to keep them from being murdered. The people continued to gather from different parts of the , and such was the wrath and determination manifested, that before light the next morning, the Mormon leaders agreed for themselves and the church, to leave the . , who lived above Blue, eight or ten miles distance, on hearing that several Mormons were in Jail without just cause, and supposing they intended to take their lives, gathered up some hundred and fifty men [p. 30]
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