John Taylor, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
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We then returned to Jail. On our return to Jail we were taken to <​Imediately after our return went to the & obtained from him, an order for us to occupy ​> a large open room containing a bedstead. I rather think the same <​See s Ac​> room had been appropriate to the use of debtors, at any rate there was free access to the Jailors house and no bars nor locks, except such as might be on the outside door of the Jail. The Jailor (Mr. ) and his wife manifested a disposition to make us as comfortable as they could; we ate at their table, which was well provided, and, of course, paid for it.
I do not remember the names of all who were with us that night and the next morning in jail, for several went and came; among those that we considered stationary was <​were​> <​See Drs Ac​> <​Doubtfull​>, , , Capt. , Dr. and . <​ <​says that he​> was there from Wednesday in the forenoon until 11 O’clock next day & that he returned for the purpose of paying attention to when <​as​> he was expected to go to the next day​> We were, however, visited by numerous friends, among whom was <​were​> Uncle , , , besides lawyers, as counsel. There was also a great variety of conversation, which was rather desultory than otherwise, and referred to circumstances that had transpired; our former and present grievances, the spirit of the troops around us, and the disposition of the ; the devising of legal, and other plans for deliverance, The nature of testimony required, the gathering of proper witnesses, and a variety of other topics, including our religious hopes &c.
During one of these conversations remarked; “Br. Joseph if it is necessary that you die in this operation, and they will take me in your stead, I will suffer for you. At another time, when conversing about deliverance, I said: [p. 45]
We then returned to Jail. Imediately after our return went to the & obtained from him, an order for us to occupy a large open room containing a bedstead. I rather think the same See s Ac room had been appropriate to the use of debtors, at any rate there was free access to the Jailors house and no bars nor locks, except such as might be on the outside door of the Jail. The Jailor (Mr. ) and his wife manifested a disposition to make us as comfortable as they could; we ate at their table, which was well provided, and, of course, paid for it.
I do not remember the names of all who were with us that night and the next morning in jail, for several went and came; among those that we considered stationary were See Drs Ac , , , Capt. , Dr. and . says that he was there from Wednesday in the forenoon until 11 O’clock next day & that he returned for the purpose of paying attention to as he was expected to go to the next day We were, however, visited by numerous friends, among whom were Uncle , , , besides lawyers, as counsel. There was also a great variety of conversation, which was rather desultory than otherwise, and referred to circumstances that had transpired; our former and present grievances, the spirit of the troops around us, and the disposition of the ; the devising of legal, and other plans for deliverance, The nature of testimony required, the gathering of proper witnesses, and a variety of other topics, including our religious hopes &c.
During one of these conversations remarked; “Br. Joseph if it is necessary that you die in this operation, and they will take me in your stead, I will suffer for you. At another time, when conversing about deliverance, I said: [p. 45]
Page 45