Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 101
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¶ It was now thursday about noon, and was at , a distance of nine miles from home, where he must ride before he could make the first move towards raising the required sum. When he arrived at home he found his , who had returned a short time before him. My fortunately found within 50 miles of home one of the letters that had written, and hurried hurried home as fast as possible.
The next day, by the request of my , I went to see an old Quaker, (a gentleman with whom we had been quite intimate ever since our commencement on the farm; who always seemed to admire the neat arrangement of the same. We hoped that he would be able, as well as willing to purchase the place; and, as he was a friend and would be disposed to show us favor, we might at least have the benefit of the crops that were upon the ground. But in this we were disappointed: not in the will of the man, but in his ability: he had just redeemed a piece of land for a friend, living in his immediate nieghborhood, and had paid out all the money he could spare. If I had been 3o minutes sooner I would have found him with $1500. dollars in his pocket. When I rehearsed to him what had taken place relative to the farm, he was much distressed for us; and very much regretted his disability to relieve our necessity. He said: “If I have no money, I will nevertheless try to do something for you; and you may tell your , that I will see him as soon as I can and let him know what the prospect is.” [p. 101]
¶ It was now thursday about noon, and at , a distance of nine miles from home, where he must ride before he could make the first move towards raising the required sum. When he arrived at home he found his , who had returned a short time before him. My fortunately found within 50 miles of home one of the letters that had written, and hurried home as fast as possible.
The next day, by the request of my , I went to see an old Quaker, (a gentleman with whom we had been quite intimate ever since our commencement on the farm; who always seemed to admire the neat arrangement of the same. We hoped that he would be able, as well as willing to purchase the place; and, as he was a friend and would be disposed to show us favor, we might at least have the benefit of the crops that were upon the ground. But in this we were disappointed: not in the will of the man, but in his ability: he had just redeemed a piece of land for a friend, living in his immediate nieghborhood, and had paid out all the money he could spare. If I had been 3o minutes sooner I would have found him with $1500. dollars in his pocket. When I rehearsed to him what had taken place relative to the farm, he was much distressed for us; and very much regretted his disability to relieve our necessity. He said: “If I have no money, I will nevertheless try to do something for you; and you may tell your , that I will see him as soon as I can and let him know what the prospect is.” [p. 101]
Page 101