Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 102
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It was nearly night, the country new, and the road that I had to travel, through a dense forest: the distance was ten miles, and that, I had to go alone; yet I hastened to inform my of the disappointment with which I had met.
As soon as I left, the old gentleman started in search of some one who could afford us relief, and the same night, came and directed us to go to a gentleman by the name of Durfee, who lived four miles distant, and see what he could do devise for our benefit. My without delay set off to see this Mr. Durfee, and reached his house before day light in the morning. He was unable to do anything himself, and sent three miles farther, to one of his sons, who was high sheriff; instructing my to tell the young man, that his father wished to see him as soon as possible. Mr. Durfee, the younger was obedi[e]nt to the call, and came without delay; and soon after arriving at his father’s house, he, in company with his father and , set off to see the farm in question, where they arrived about 10. o’clock A. M. They tarried a short time, then rode on to see the agent and the men who held the deed of the place.
The anxiety of mind that I suffered that day, can easier be imagined than described: I now looked upon the proceeds of our industry, which smiled around us on every hand, with a kind of yearning attachment, that I never before had experienced: our early losses I did not feel so keenly, for I then realized that we were young, and by making some exertion we could better our circumstances; besides this, I had not felt the inconveniences of poverty as I had [p. 102]
It was nearly night, the country new, and the road that I had to travel, through a dense forest: the distance was ten miles, and that, I had to go alone; yet I hastened to inform my of the disappointment with which I had met.
As soon as I left, the old gentleman started in search of some one who could afford us relief, and the same night, came and directed us to go to a gentleman by the name of Durfee, who lived four miles distant, and see what he could devise for our benefit. My without delay set off to see this Mr. Durfee, and reached his house before day light in the morning. He was unable to do anything himself, and sent three miles farther, to one of his sons, who was high sheriff; instructing my to tell the young man, that his father wished to see him as soon as possible. Mr. Durfee, the younger was obedient to the call, and came without delay; and soon after arriving at his father’s house, he, in company with his father and , set off to see the farm in question, where they arrived about 10. o’clock A. M. They tarried a short time, then rode on to see the agent and the men who held the deed of the place.
The anxiety of mind that I suffered that day, can easier be imagined than described: I now looked upon the proceeds of our industry, which smiled around us on every hand, with a kind of yearning attachment, that I never before had experienced: our early losses I did not feel so keenly, for I then realized that we were young, and by making some exertion we could better our circumstances; besides this, I had not felt the inconveniences of poverty as I had [p. 102]
Page 102