Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 142
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As the time was now drawing to a close for which we had agreed for the place, we began to make preparations to remove our family and effects to the house in which <​​> resided. We now felt more keenly than ever the injustice of the measure which had placed a landlord over us on our own premises; and which was about to eject us from them.
This I thought would be a good occasion for bringing to ’s mind the cause of all our present privations, as well as the misfortunes which he himself was liable to, if he should turn his back upon the world, and set out in the service of God: “Now ,’ Said I, “see what a comfortable home we have had here;— what pains each child we have had, has taken to provide for us every thing necessary to make old age comfortable and long life desirable: here, especially, I look upon the handy work of my beloved , who, even upon his death bed, and in his last moments, charged his brothers to finish his work, which was to prepare a place of earthly rest for us; that, if it were possible, through the exertions of the children, our last days might be our best days; indeed there is scarcely anything which I here see that has not passed through the hands of that faithful boy; and afterwards by his brothers been arranged precisely according to his every plan: thus showing to me their affectionate remembrance, both of their parents, and of the brother whom they loved. All these tender recolections, do render our present trial doubly severe; for these dear relics must now pass into the hands of wicked men, who fear not God, neither do they regard man. And upon what righteous principle [p. 142]
As the time was now drawing to a close for which we had agreed for the place, we began to make preparations to remove our family and effects to the house in which resided. We now felt more keenly than ever the injustice of the measure which had placed a landlord over us on our own premises; and which was about to eject us from them.
This I thought would be a good occasion for bringing to ’s mind the cause of all our present privations, as well as the misfortunes which he himself was liable to, if he should turn his back upon the world, and set out in the service of God: “Now ,’ Said I, “see what a comfortable home we have had here;— what pains each child we have , has taken to provide for us every thing necessary to make old age comfortable and long life desirable: here, especially, I look upon the handy work of my beloved , who, even upon his death bed, and in his last moments, charged his brothers to finish his work, which was to prepare a place of earthly rest for us; that, if it were possible, through the exertions of the children, our last days might be our best days; indeed there is scarcely anything which I here see that has not passed through the hands of that faithful boy; and afterwards by his brothers been arranged precisely according to his every plan: thus showing to me their affectionate remembrance, both of their parents, and of the brother whom they loved. All these tender recolections, do render our present trial doubly severe; for these dear relics must now pass into the hands of wicked men, who fear not God, neither do they regard man. And upon what righteous principle [p. 142]
Page 142