Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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has all this been brought about? Have they ever lifted a finger to earn any part of that which they now claim? I tell you they have not. Yet I now give up all this for the sake of Christ and salvation; and I pray God to help me to do so, without a murmur or a tear:— And in the strength of God I say, that, from this time forth, I will not cast one longing look upon anything, which I now leave behind me. Yet, in consequence of these things, , we cannot make you comfortable any longer, and you will be under the necessity of taking boarding somewhere else.”
,’ exclaimed the young , “let me stay with you, for I can live in any log house hut, where you and live; but I cannot leave you; so do not mention it.”
In April and set out for . The weather, for some time, had been very wet and disagreeable,— raining, freezing and thawing alternately, which rendered the roads almost impassable, particularly in the middle of the day; yet was not to be detained, either by wind or weather; and they persevered until thy reached Joseph’s.
Joseph had been so hurried with his secular affairs, that he could not proceed with his spiritual concerns as fast as was necessary for the speedy completion of the work— there was also another disadvantage under which he labored: had so much of her time taken up with the care of her house, that she could write for him but a small portion of the time:— In consequence of these embarrassments Joseph called upon the [p. 143]
has all this been brought about? Have they ever lifted a finger to earn any part of that which they now claim? I tell you they have not. Yet I now give up all this for the sake of Christ and salvation; and I pray God to help me to do so, without a murmur or a tear:— And in the strength of God I say, that, from this time forth, I will not cast one longing look upon anything, which I now leave behind me. Yet, in consequence of these things, , we cannot make you comfortable any longer, and you will be under the necessity of taking boarding somewhere else.”
,’ exclaimed the young , “let me stay with you, for I can live in any log hut, where you and live; but I cannot leave you; so do not mention it.”
In April and set out for . The weather, for some time, had been very wet and disagreeable,— raining, freezing and thawing alternately, which rendered the roads almost impassable, particularly in the middle of the day; yet was not to be detained, either by wind or weather; and they persevered until thy reached Joseph’s.
Joseph had been so hurried with his secular affairs, that he could not proceed with his spiritual concerns as fast as was necessary for the speedy completion of the work— there was also another disadvantage under which he labored: had so much of her time taken up with the care of her house, that she could write for him but a small portion of the time:— In consequence of these embarrassments Joseph called upon the [p. 143]
Page 143