Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 166
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his printing nights and sundays.
Upon reading the prospectus of his paper, they found that he had agreed with his subscribers to publish one form of Joe Smiths Gold Bible each week, and thereby furnish them with the principle portion of the Book in such a way that they would not be obliged to pay the smiths for it. His paper was entitled, Dogberry Paper on Winter Hill. In this he had thrown together the <​a parcel of​> most vulgar and disgusting prose, and the meanest and most low lived doggerel in juxtaposition with a portion with a portion of the Book of Mormon, which he had pilfered.
At this perversion of common sense and moral feeling, was shocked; as well as indignant at the dishonest course which he <​​> had taken in order to possess himself of the work.
,” said he, “what right have you to print <​the​> it book of Mormon in this manner? Do you not know that we have secured the copy right.
“It is none of your business;” answered ; I have hired the press, I will print what I please, so help yourself.”
: rejoined that manuscript is sacred; and I forbid you printing any more of it
,” exclaimed , in a tone of anger, “I dont care a d—mn for you: that d—m—d Gold Bible is going into my paper in spite of all you can do.
endeavored to disuade him from his purpose but finding him inexorable, left him to isue his paper as he had hitherto done; for, when they found him at work, he had already isued six or eight numbers, and <​but​>, by taking them ten or twenty miles into the country, had managed to keep them out of our [p. 166]
his printing nights and sundays.
Upon reading the prospectus of his paper, they found that he had agreed with his subscribers to publish one form of Joe Smiths Gold Bible each week, and thereby furnish them with the principle portion of the Book in such a way that they would not be obliged to pay the smiths for it. His paper was entitled, Dogberry Paper on Winter Hill. In this he had thrown together the a parcel of most vulgar and disgusting prose, and the meanest and most low lived doggerel in juxtaposition with a portion of the Book of Mormon, which he had pilfered.
At this perversion of common sense and moral feeling, was shocked; as well as indignant at the dishonest course which had taken in order to possess himself of the work.
,” said he, “what right have you to print the book of Mormon in this manner? Do you not know that we have secured the copy right.
“It is none of your business;” answered ; I have hired the press, I will print what I please, so help yourself.”
: rejoined that manuscript is sacred; and I forbid you printing any more of it
,” exclaimed , in a tone of anger, “I dont care a d—mn for you: that d—m—d Gold Bible is going into my paper in spite of all you can do.
endeavored to disuade him from his purpose but finding him inexorable, left him to isue his paper as he had hitherto done; for, when they found him at work, he had already isued six or eight numbers, but, had managed to keep them out of our [p. 166]
Page 166