Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 168
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,” said Joseph in a low significant tone, “there is law; and you will find that out, if you do not understand it; but I shall not fight you sir
At this the ex Justice, began to cool off a little; and finally concluded to submit to an arbitration, which decided that he should stop his proceedings forthwith; so he made us no farther trouble
Joseph, after disposing of this affair, returned to ; but not long to remain there, for, when the inhabitants of the surrounding country perceived that the work still progressed, they became uneasy, and again called a large meeting. At this time, they gathered their forces together, far & near; and organizing themselves into a committee of the whole they resolved, as before, never to purchase one of our books when they should be printed. They then appointed a committee to wait upon , and inform him of the resolution which they had passed; and also, to explain to him the evill consequences which would result to him therefrom. The men who were appointed to do this errand fulfilled there mission to the letter; and urged upon the necessity of his putting a stop to the printing as the Smiths had lost all their property; consequently would be unable to pay him for his work, except by the sale of the books. And this they would never be able to do, for the people would not purchase them. This information caused to stop printing; and we were again compelled to send for Joseph. These trips back and forth exhausted nearly all our means; yet they seemed unavoidable
When Joseph came, he went immediately with to ; and succeeded in removing his fears, so that he went on with the work untill the books were printed which was in the spring of 1830 [p. 168]
,” said Joseph in a low significant tone, “there is law; and you will find that out, if you do not understand it; but I shall not fight you sir
At this the ex Justice, began to cool off a little; and finally concluded to submit to an arbitration, which decided that he should stop his proceedings forthwith; so he made us no farther trouble
Joseph, after disposing of this affair, returned to ; but not long to remain there, for, when the inhabitants of the surrounding country perceived that the work still progressed, they became uneasy, and again called a large meeting. At this time, they gathered their forces together, far & near; and organizing themselves into a committee of the whole they resolved, as before, never to purchase one of our books when they should be printed. They then appointed a committee to wait upon , and inform him of the resolution which they had passed; and also, to explain to him the evill consequences which would result to him therefrom. The men who were appointed to do this errand fulfilled there mission to the letter; and urged upon the necessity of his putting a stop to the printing as the Smiths had lost all their property; consequently would be unable to pay him for his work, except by the sale of the books. And this they would never be able to do, for the people would not purchase them. This information caused to stop printing; and we were again compelled to send for Joseph. These trips back and forth exhausted nearly all our means; yet they seemed unavoidable
When Joseph came, he went immediately with to ; and succeeded in removing his fears, so that he went on with the work untill the books were printed which was in the spring of 1830 [p. 168]
Page 168