Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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with drawn swords and loaded muskets: “and now” continued he “I swear by God, that if any man attempts to harm a hair of their heads, I’ll cut his damned head off the minute he does it. And do you (speaking to his men) protect them; and if any man attempts to lift his gun to his face to shoot them prisoners, cut him down instantly; for they are innocent men— I know they are innocent— look at them, they show it <​plainly​> it in their very countenances.
This man was but a captain; yet he asumed the responsibility of protecting my sons. And for two nights and a day, he stood constantly on guard, keeping his men to their posts; he neither slept himself nor suffered his Company to rest, until Joseph and were removed from the place.
When they were about from a messenger came and told us, that if we ever saw our sons alive, we must go immediately to them; for they were in a wagon that would start in a few minutes for , and in all probbability they would never return alive. My was unable to go, so and myself set out alone for the place. On coming within 400 yards of the wagon, we were compelled to stop; for we could press no farther through the crowd. I therefore appealed to those around me, exclaiming, I am the of the prophet— is there not a gentleman here, who will assist me to that wagon, that I may take a last look at my children, I and speak to them once more. Upon this one individual volunteered to make a pathway through the army; and we passed on, threatened with death at every step, till at length we arrived there. The man, who led us through the crowd, spoke to , who setting in front; and telling him that his had come to see him, requested, that he should reach his hand to me. He did so but I was not allowed to see him: the cover was of strong cloth, [p. 280]
with drawn swords and loaded muskets: “and now” continued he “I swear by God, that if any man attempts to harm a hair of their heads, I’ll cut his damned head off the minute he does it. And do you (speaking to his men) protect them; and if any man attempts to lift his gun to his face to shoot them prisoners, cut him down instantly; for they are innocent men— I know they are innocent— look at them, they show it plainly it in their very countenances.
This man was but a captain; yet he asumed the responsibility of protecting my sons. And for two nights and a day, he stood constantly on guard, keeping his men to their posts; he neither slept himself nor suffered his Company to rest, until Joseph and were removed from the place.
When they were about from a messenger came and told us, that if we ever saw our sons alive, we must go immediately to them; for they were in a wagon that would start in a few minutes for , and in all probbability they would never return alive. My was unable to go, so and myself set out alone for the place. On coming within 400 yards of the wagon, we were compelled to stop; for we could press no farther through the crowd. I therefore appealed to those around me, exclaiming, I am the of the prophet— is there not a gentleman here, who will assist me to that wagon, that I may take a last look at my children, and speak to them once more. Upon this one individual volunteered to make a pathway through the army; and we passed on, threatened with death at every step, till at length we arrived there. The man, who led us through the crowd, spoke to , who setting in front; and telling him that his had come to see him, requested, that he should reach his hand to me. He did so but I was not allowed to see him: the cover was of strong cloth, [p. 280]
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