Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the town of Gilsum, Cheshire county, and State of New Hampshire July 8th, 1776. When I arrived at the age of 8 years, my mother had a severe fit of sickness: she was so low, that her <​friends​> as well as herself entirely despaired of her recovery. During this sickness, she called her children around her bed, and, after exhorting them, to always remember the instructions which she had given them: to fear God and walk uprightly before him, she gave me to my brother Stephen [Mack]; requesting him to take care of me and bring me up as his own child, then bade each of us, farewell.
This my brother promised to do; but, as mother shortly recovered, it was not necessary, and I consequently remained at my ’s house until my sister Lovisa [Mack] was married; <​some time​> after which I went to South Hadly, where my sister was living, to pay her [illegible] Lovisa a visit who was living there. In this last named place, lived one Col. Woodbridge, who purchased a large church bell, which was suspended while I was visiting with my sister: immediately after it was hung myself in company with a number of my young associates, went to see the bell, and it so happened that I was the first person who rang it. This Col. Woodbridge afterwards built a large establishment for the education of poor children.
After visiting about six months with Lovisa I returned home, and remained with my parents until the death of Lovina [Mack]. Soon after which my brother Stephen, who was living at Tunbridge, came to my ’s on a visit, and he insisted, so earnestly on my accompanying him home, that my parents consented: The grief, occasioned by the death of Lovina, was preying upon my health, and threatened [p. 27]
the town of Gilsum, Cheshire county, and State of New Hampshire July 8th, 1776. When I arrived at the age of 8 years, my mother had a severe fit of sickness: she was so low, that her friends as well as herself entirely despaired of her recovery. During this sickness, she called her children around her bed, and, after exhorting them, to always remember the instructions which she had given them: to fear God and walk uprightly before him, she gave me to my brother Stephen Mack; requesting him to take care of me and bring me up as his own child, then bade each of us, farewell.
This my brother promised to do; but, as mother shortly recovered, it was not necessary, and I consequently remained at my ’s house until my sister Lovisa Mack was married; some time after which I went to South Hadly, , to pay Lovisa a visit who was living there. In this last named place, lived one Col. Woodbridge, who purchased a large church bell, which was suspended while I was visiting with my sister: immediately after it was hung myself in company with a number of my young associates, went to see the bell, and it so happened that I was the first person who rang it. This Col. Woodbridge afterwards built a large establishment for the education of poor children.
After visiting about six months with Lovisa I returned home, and remained with my parents until the death of Lovina Mack. Soon after which my brother Stephen, who was living at Tunbridge, came to my ’s on a visit, and he insisted, so earnestly on my accompanying him home, that my parents consented: The grief, occasioned by the death of Lovina, was preying upon my health, and threatened [p. 27]
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