Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 72
image
wants. Although many of the Mormons deserve hanging, as an atonement for their criminal proceedings and corrrupt intentions, they are truly objects of charity.
But if this intrinsically vagrant race, (the Mormons) would relieve themselves from the humiliating necessity of asking charity, they should mind their own business, abandon abolition, and apply themselves to hard labor, as those do who are actively engaged in attempting their relief.
No attempt should be made to retain a single Mormon within the boundaries of . A Colonization society might find advantageous employment in sending them all off to Botany Bay.” I have only to enquire of the editor who published the above, first, what advantage hard labor would be to a people who are banished from all their hard earnings in the , and are now recommended to be banished the Continent and sent to Botany Bay? Secondly, whether crimes and corrupt intentions are more manifest in the conduct of the Mormons, than in the sentiments of the editor of the “Saturday News”? What greater crime can a person be guilty of, than destroying the rights of men, women and children, and banishing eleven thousand citizens from their houses and lands, and thus overthrowing the government, constitution and laws of our once happy Republic? These criminal proceedings, the pious editor recommends, and still further proposes a second and more distant banishment of our suffering people. O, Editor! blush to put forth such bare-faced absurdity, and imposition. Thirdly, our Society has never taken part in the abolition question, neither one side or the other, but each individual thinks as he pleases on that subject. The following resolves were unanimously adopted at a large meeting of the people of , Missouri, and published in one of the journals of the . We publish them to show what bare faced absurdity men can be guilty of; the reader [p. 72]
wants. Although many of the Mormons deserve hanging, as an atonement for their criminal proceedings and corrrupt intentions, they are truly objects of charity.
But if this intrinsically vagrant race, (the Mormons) would relieve themselves from the humiliating necessity of asking charity, they should mind their own business, abandon abolition, and apply themselves to hard labor, as those do who are actively engaged in attempting their relief.
No attempt should be made to retain a single Mormon within the boundaries of . A Colonization society might find advantageous employment in sending them all off to Botany Bay.” I have only to enquire of the editor who published the above, first, what advantage hard labor would be to a people who are banished from all their hard earnings in the , and are now recommended to be banished the Continent and sent to Botany Bay? Secondly, whether crimes and corrupt intentions are more manifest in the conduct of the Mormons, than in the sentiments of the editor of the “Saturday News”? What greater crime can a person be guilty of, than destroying the rights of men, women and children, and banishing eleven thousand citizens from their houses and lands, and thus overthrowing the government, constitution and laws of our once happy Republic? These criminal proceedings, the pious editor recommends, and still further proposes a second and more distant banishment of our suffering people. O, Editor! blush to put forth such bare-faced absurdity, and imposition. Thirdly, our Society has never taken part in the abolition question, neither one side or the other, but each individual thinks as he pleases on that subject. The following resolves were unanimously adopted at a large meeting of the people of , Missouri, and published in one of the journals of the . We publish them to show what bare faced absurdity men can be guilty of; the reader [p. 72]
Page 72