Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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tunity now, to take vengeance, in swearing against him; so he swore that in he saw have a clock, in his arms. There had been a clock found in some hazel bushes, somewhere in the neighborhood of . This clock, a man in , swore to be his; it was presented to , and swore positively that, that was the clock, he saw have in . Now the truth is, that the clock which said had, belonged to another man; who had it at that time, and has it at this, if he has not sold it; and it is now in . This, could have proven if he could have introduced his witnesses. For this, he was bound over to appear at the Court, in the sum of one thousand dollars. Another by the name of [Andrew] Job, whose mother had gone to the house of and swore a featherbed which was in his house was her’s: After she got away, she said she never had a bed since she lived in ; but she wanted one of “old ’s” beds. Her son came to the court to swear against for stealing; and accordingly swore that his mother’s bed was found in his house. The question was asked, how he knew it was his mother’s bed? He said he had slept upon it and he felt the stripes with his feet: His mother’s bed had a striped tick, and the stripes went two ways; and he felt them with his feet while lying in the bed. He was then asked if there was not a sheet on the bed under him? He said there was, but still he felt the stripes in the tick through the sheet, so distinctly that he knew that they went two ways, and that it was his mother’s bed, and that was the way they found out, his mother’s bed was there. proved, in the mean time, that, that same bed had been in his house for many years. We give these as specimens of men’s swearing. We might multiply them to a great number, but it would swell this narrative beyound the limits allowed it. Let so much suffice.
The court at last closed on the 29th of November, after a session of two weeks, and three days, and during most of the time we were closely confined in chains. At the close of the court, and some few days before it closed, [p. 68]
tunity now, to take vengeance, in swearing against him; so he swore that in he saw have a clock, in his arms. There had been a clock found in some hazel bushes, somewhere in the neighborhood of . This clock, a man in , swore to be his; it was presented to , and swore positively that, that was the clock, he saw have in . Now the truth is, that the clock which said had, belonged to another man; who had it at that time, and has it at this, if he has not sold it; and it is now in . This, could have proven if he could have introduced his witnesses. For this, he was bound over to appear at the Court, in the sum of one thousand dollars. Another by the name of Andrew Job, whose mother had gone to the house of and swore a featherbed which was in his house was her’s: After she got away, she said she never had a bed since she lived in ; but she wanted one of “old ’s” beds. Her son came to the court to swear against for stealing; and accordingly swore that his mother’s bed was found in his house. The question was asked, how he knew it was his mother’s bed? He said he had slept upon it and he felt the stripes with his feet: His mother’s bed had a striped tick, and the stripes went two ways; and he felt them with his feet while lying in the bed. He was then asked if there was not a sheet on the bed under him? He said there was, but still he felt the stripes in the tick through the sheet, so distinctly that he knew that they went two ways, and that it was his mother’s bed, and that was the way they found out, his mother’s bed was there. proved, in the mean time, that, that same bed had been in his house for many years. We give these as specimens of men’s swearing. We might multiply them to a great number, but it would swell this narrative beyound the limits allowed it. Let so much suffice.
The court at last closed on the 29th of November, after a session of two weeks, and three days, and during most of the time we were closely confined in chains. At the close of the court, and some few days before it closed, [p. 68]
Page 68