Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 44[a]
image
as to make us afraid to proceed without more guards a messenger was therefore dispactched to to obtain them. We started before their arrival but had not gone far untill we met with a guard if we recollect right of twenty four men I as this to the number however we are not certain; and were conducted by them to and put in to and old vacant house and a guard set. Some time through the course of that day came in and we were introduced to him We enquired of him the reason why we had been thus carried from our homes and what were the charges against us. He said that he was not then able to determine but would be in a short time and with very little more conversation withdrew. Some short time after he had withdrawn came in with two chains in his hands and a number of padlocks the two chains he fastened together. He had with him ten men armed who stood at the time of these opperations with a thumb uppon the cock of their guns: The first nailed down the windows and then— came and ordered a man by the name of John Fulkerson whom he he had with him to chains us together with his chains and padlock, being seven in number after that he searched us running his hand into our pockets to see if we had any arms what finding nothing but pocket knives he took them and carried them off.
Either the next day or the day after
spent several days in searching the statute to find some authority to hold a court martial the troops that were said that he had promised when they left that there were two or three that they should have the priviledge of shooting before they returned. But he could find none [p. 44[a]]
as to make us afraid to proceed without more guards a messenger was therefore dispactched to to obtain them. We started before their arrival but had not gone far untill we met with a guard if we recollect right of twenty four men as to the number however we are not certain; and were conducted by them to and put in to and old vacant house and a guard set. Some time through the course of that day came in and we were introduced to him We enquired of him the reason why we had been thus carried from our homes and what were the charges against us. He said that he was not then able to determine but would be in a short time and with very little more conversation withdrew. Some short time after he had withdrawn came in with two chains in his hands and a number of padlocks the two chains he fastened together. He had with him ten men armed who stood at the time of these opperations with a thumb uppon the cock of their guns: The first nailed down the windows and then— came and ordered a man by the name of John Fulkerson whom he he had with him to chain us together with his chains and padlock, being seven in number after that he searched us running his hand into our pockets to see if we had any arms finding nothing but pocket knives he took them and carried them off.
spent several days in searching the statute to find some authority to hold a court martial the troops said that he had promised when they left that there were two or three that they should have the priviledge of shooting before they returned. But he could find none [p. 44[a]]
Page 44[a]