Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [26[b]]
image
to <​the​> citizens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand with diffculties, and a beastly mob, threatning their lives, and not only threatning, but using all their efforts to do it <​to take​>; for scouting parties of the mob were round round in every direction, stealing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could git. They set fire to a house owned by a man, by the name of , and burned it to ashes, and the man and his family barely escaped with their lives. They were deprived of making any provision whatever for their families, many of whom were sick laying in waggons <​wagons​> and in tents, without any other shelter. Numbers of them died for want of proper attendance in sickness. Many females that were in delicate situation gave birth to children, under these forbidding circumstances, and to crown all; their provisions were getting very low, and they could see nothing but actual starvation before them by continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness in their midst, made thier case deplorable, indeed, Parents <​parents​> had to stand still and witness the death of their children, without out the means to even make them comfortable in their dying moments. And childred had to do the same for with parents. these They civil authorities as well as the military, had all refused to do their duty, and were many of <​them​> at least, has deeply engaged in the mob as any others others. In the mean time, and , who had been the sole cause of the settlements being made, in went and solicited the saints to leave the place. said that he had assurances from the mob that if the saints they would leave the place, that they would not be hurt, and that they would be paid for all their losses, which they had sustained [p. [26[b]]]
to the citizens of .
The people finding themselves pressed on every hand with diffculties, and a mob, threatning their lives, and not only threatning, but using all their efforts to to take; for scouting parties were round in every direction, stealing cattle, horses, and all kinds of property that they could git. They set fire to a house owned by a man, by the name of , and burned it to ashes, and the man and his family barely escaped with their lives. They were deprived of making any provision whatever for their families, many of whom were sick laying in wagons and in tents, without any other shelter. Numbers of them died for want of proper attendance in sickness. Many females that were in delicate situation gave birth to children, under these forbidding circumstances, and to crown all; their provisions were getting very low, and they could see nothing but actual starvation before them by continuing where they were. This, added to the sickness in their midst, made thier case deplorable, indeed, parents had to stand still and witness the death of their children, without out the means to even make them comfortable in their dying moments. And childred had to do the same with parents. They civil authorities as well as the military, had all refused to do their duty, and were many of them at least, has deeply engaged in the mob as any others. In the mean time, and , who had been the sole cause of the settlements being made, solicited the saints to leave the place. said that he had assurances from the mob that if the they would leave the place, that they would not be hurt, and that they would be paid for all the losses, which they had [p. [26[b]]]
Page [26[b]]