Times and Seasons, 16 May 1842

  • Source Note
Page 790
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who had come from . He afterwards had a discussion with Elder W. Hardman, when it turned out that the pretended American was a Scotchman. Linsey, Newton and the clique who were Berry Jr’s. supporters again supported this sleepy character, who borrowed the name of American to deceive the people.
I remain Yours &c.
 
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, MAY 16, 1842.
——————————
 
☞ It will be seen by several extracts taken from different papers, that the press is changing its tone a little, in regard to the subject of Mormonism; many of the most recpectable, influential, and widely circulated periodicals are beginning to look at Mormonism in its true light: at any rate they are for investigating the subject impartially, and as honest, and candid journalists, they speak of it as they find it. Such is Mr. , of the Herald; Mr. William Bartlett, of the Dollar Weekly Bostonian; the New York State Mechanic, published by Mr. Joel Munson; and the Democrat; published by Col. .
The first cut of a facsimile from the Book of Abraham, has been re-published both in the New York Herald, and in the Dollar Weekly Bostonian, as well as in the Boston Daily Ledger, Edited by Mr. Bartltet; together with the translation from the Book of Abraham. Mr. Bartlett says that he “intends opening a corespondence with us, that he may acquaint himself with our public and private acts.“ &c. we can assure Mr. Bartlett that we shall be most happy to put him in possession of any information that he may require pertaining to our society, as we have always courted publicity, and investigation, and chose light rather than darkness.—Ed.
 
————
Elder , has just arrived in with about 150 emigrants from England; a ship load came some time ago, and another is expected soon.
 
————
We had a general review of the Legion, on Saturday the 7th inst. The Legion presented a beautiful appearance, the officers of the different Cohorts, Battalions and Companies, equiped themselves well: and in passing through their various evolutlons, both officers and men, showed a knowledge of military tactics, far in advance of what could have been expected from the little experiance they have had and the short time the Legion has been formed. They have very much improved both in good discipline and uniform, since last year. Many thousands of spectators were present; no accident occurred; but good will, order, peace, harmony, and hilarity was manifested; both by the companies, and the spectators.
 
————
COMMUNICATIONS.
————
EVANGELICAL RELIGION.
To the Editor of the Times and Seasons:
Sir, having been in the habit of late of perusing the “Cross and Journal,” a Baptist periodical published in , Ohio, to search out the pure principles that are advocated by this advocate of righteousness; in my investigations I happened to blunder over the following extracts;—as they were interesting to me, I had the vanity to suppose the[y] might be the same to yourself. If they are, and you should judge them worthy of a place in your valuable periodical, they are at your disposal, together with my reflections upon them.
“Prayer was offered up by Rev. Dr. Jenks, after which Mr. Knapp addressed them in a sermon of an hour and a half in length, from the words of Saul of Tarsus, Acts, 9:6, ‘Lord what wilt thou have me to to do?’. . . . ‘The text is the language of a young convert. . . . . The enquiry is not where you can enjoy the most; but where you can do the most for the glory of God. Some of you in answering this question may be called to preach the gospel, others to go on a foreign mission.”
1. “The first answer is, “take my yoke upon you.” Unite yourselves to the people of God. Join some evangelical church.”
* * * * * * *
5. “Search the scriptures.” “If you have irreligious books, novels, or books on Universalism, burn them up. Make the bible your study. Carry it in your pocket: have it at hand at all times, and as much as possible commit it to memory. Be in the habit of reading it upon your knees, and of looking directly to the spirit of God to enable you to understand it.”
Having perused the above passages, sir, and not being very quick of apprehension, I examined them a second time, when I had the following reflections:—“Prayer was offered by the Rev. Dr. Jenks:”—Well now, that seems to be good—afterwards Mr. Knapp preached from the words of Saul of Tarsus;” “Lord what wilt thou have me to do?” These seem to be good words—they are scriptural words; and I think Mr. Knapp has preached FROM [p. 790]
who had come from . He afterwards had a discussion with Elder W. Hardman, when it turned out that the pretended American was a Scotchman. Linsey, Newton and the clique who were Berry Jr’s. supporters again supported this sleepy character, who borrowed the name of American to deceive the people.
I remain Yours &c.
 
——————————
TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, MAY 16, 1842.
——————————
 
☞ It will be seen by several extracts taken from different papers, that the press is changing its tone a little, in regard to the subject of Mormonism; many of the most recpectable, influential, and widely circulated periodicals are beginning to look at Mormonism in its true light: at any rate they are for investigating the subject impartially, and as honest, and candid journalists, they speak of it as they find it. Such is Mr. , of the Herald; Mr. William Bartlett, of the Dollar Weekly Bostonian; the New York State Mechanic, published by Mr. Joel Munson; and the Democrat; published by Col. .
The first cut of a facsimile from the Book of Abraham, has been re-published both in the New York Herald, and in the Dollar Weekly Bostonian, as well as in the Boston Daily Ledger, Edited by Mr. Bartltet; together with the translation from the Book of Abraham. Mr. Bartlett says that he “intends opening a corespondence with us, that he may acquaint himself with our public and private acts.“ &c. we can assure Mr. Bartlett that we shall be most happy to put him in possession of any information that he may require pertaining to our society, as we have always courted publicity, and investigation, and chose light rather than darkness.—Ed.
 
————
Elder , has just arrived in with about 150 emigrants from England; a ship load came some time ago, and another is expected soon.
 
————
We had a general review of the Legion, on Saturday the 7th inst. The Legion presented a beautiful appearance, the officers of the different Cohorts, Battalions and Companies, equiped themselves well: and in passing through their various evolutlons, both officers and men, showed a knowledge of military tactics, far in advance of what could have been expected from the little experiance they have had and the short time the Legion has been formed. They have very much improved both in good discipline and uniform, since last year. Many thousands of spectators were present; no accident occurred; but good will, order, peace, harmony, and hilarity was manifested; both by the companies, and the spectators.
 
————
COMMUNICATIONS.
————
EVANGELICAL RELIGION.
To the Editor of the Times and Seasons:
Sir, having been in the habit of late of perusing the “Cross and Journal,” a Baptist periodical published in , Ohio, to search out the pure principles that are advocated by this advocate of righteousness; in my investigations I happened to blunder over the following extracts;—as they were interesting to me, I had the vanity to suppose they might be the same to yourself. If they are, and you should judge them worthy of a place in your valuable periodical, they are at your disposal, together with my reflections upon them.
“Prayer was offered up by Rev. Dr. Jenks, after which Mr. Knapp addressed them in a sermon of an hour and a half in length, from the words of Saul of Tarsus, Acts, 9:6, ‘Lord what wilt thou have me to to do?’. . . . ‘The text is the language of a young convert. . . . . The enquiry is not where you can enjoy the most; but where you can do the most for the glory of God. Some of you in answering this question may be called to preach the gospel, others to go on a foreign mission.”
1. “The first answer is, “take my yoke upon you.” Unite yourselves to the people of God. Join some evangelical church.”
* * * * * * *
5. “Search the scriptures.” “If you have irreligious books, novels, or books on Universalism, burn them up. Make the bible your study. Carry it in your pocket: have it at hand at all times, and as much as possible commit it to memory. Be in the habit of reading it upon your knees, and of looking directly to the spirit of God to enable you to understand it.”
Having perused the above passages, sir, and not being very quick of apprehension, I examined them a second time, when I had the following reflections:—“Prayer was offered by the Rev. Dr. Jenks:”—Well now, that seems to be good—afterwards Mr. Knapp preached from the words of Saul of Tarsus;” “Lord what wilt thou have me to do?” These seem to be good words—they are scriptural words; and I think Mr. Knapp has preached FROM [p. 790]
Page 790