History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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fact, and this testimony shall shine upon the records  of the saints, and be <recorded on the archives of heaven to be> read in the day of eternity, when  the wicked and perverse, who have vilely slandered  them without cause or provocation, reap their reward  with the unjust, where there is weeping, wailing and  gnashing of teeth!— if they do not repent.
Soon after this visit to Cumorah, a gentleman from  the south part of the State, (,) employ ed our brother as a common laborer, and accordi ngly he visited that section of <the> country; and had  he not been accused of digging down all, or nearly  so the mountains of Susquehannah [Susquehanna], or causing others  to do it by some art of nicromancy, I should leave this,  for the present, unnoticed. You will remember, in the  mean time, that those who seek to vilify his character,  say that he has always been notorious for his idlen ess. This gentleman, whose name is , resided in  the town of , on or near the head waters of  the Susquehannah river. Some forty miles south, or down  the river, in the town of , Susquehannah county,  Pa. is said to be a cave or subteraneous recess, whether  entirely formed by art or not I am uninformed, neith er does this matter; but such is said to be the case,—  where a company of Spaniards, a long time since, wh en the country was uninhabited by white setlers,  excavated from the bowels of the earth ore, and coi ned a large quantity of money; after which they se cured the cavity and evacuated, leaving a part  still in the cave, purposing to return at some distant  period. A long time elapsed and this account  came from one of the individuals who was first  engaged in this <mining> buisness. The country was poin ted out and the spot minutely described. This I  believe, is the substance, so far as my memory ser ves, though I shall not pledge my verasity for  the correctness of the account as I have given.—
Enough however, was credited of the Spaniards  story, to ex[c]ite the belief of many that there was  a fine sum of the precious metal lying coined  in this subteraneous vault, among whom was [p. 101]
fact, and this testimony shall shine upon the records of the saints, and be recorded on the archives of heaven to be read in the day of eternity, when the wicked and perverse, who have vilely slandered them without cause or provocation, reap their reward with the unjust, where there is weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth!— if they do not repent.
Soon after this visit to Cumorah, a gentleman from the south part of the State, (,) employed our brother as a common laborer, and accordingly he visited that section of the country; and had he not been accused of digging down all, or nearly so the mountains of Susquehannah [Susquehanna], or causing others to do it by some art of nicromancy, I should leave this, for the present, unnoticed. You will remember, in the mean time, that those who seek to vilify his character, say that he has always been notorious for his idleness. This gentleman, whose name is , resided in the town of , on or near the head waters of the Susquehannah river. Some forty miles south, or down the river, in the town of , Susquehannah county, Pa. is said to be a cave or subteraneous recess, whether entirely formed by art or not I am uninformed, neither does this matter; but such is said to be the case,— where a company of Spaniards, a long time since, when the country was uninhabited by white setlers, excavated from the bowels of the earth ore, and coined a large quantity of money; after which they secured the cavity and evacuated, leaving a part still in the cave, purposing to return at some distant period. A long time elapsed and this account came from one of the individuals who was first engaged in this mining buisness. The country was pointed out and the spot minutely described. This I believe, is the substance, so far as my memory serves, though I shall not pledge my verasity for the correctness of the account as I have given.—
Enough however, was credited of the Spaniards story, to excite the belief of many that there was a fine sum of the precious metal lying coined in this subteraneous vault, among whom was [p. 101]
Page 101