History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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that it was generally the case that too much altercation was indul ged on both sides, and their debates protracted to an unprofitable length.  He was now called to his supper. After being seated around the table,   observed to , that the thought had just  occurred to his mind, that perhaps, in about one year from that time  they might be seated together, around a table in the land of Zion.  His observed, on hearing this remark, she hoped it might be the case,  that not only they, but the rest of the company present might be  seated around a table in that land of promise. The same sentiment  was reciprocated by the company round the table, to which his full  soul seemed to respond his hearty amen, praying God to grant it  in the name of Jesus Christ. After supper he went again to the High  Council, accompanied at this time, with his , and some others that  belonged to his household. He was solicited to take a seat with the  Presidency, and preside in the case of Sister [Mary Cahoon] Elliott. He did so, his  was mother was called as testimony and began to relate circumstances  that had previously been brought before the church and settled. He  objected against such testimony. The Complainant,  arose and accused him of invalidating or doubting his ’s’ testi mony, which he had not done, nor had he any desire to do so. He told his  Brother he was out of place and asked him to set down: but he  refused; the request was repeated and became enraged. He was finally  ordered to set down, but said he would not, unless he was knocked down.  By this time he (President J. S. Junr.) became wounded and agitated in  his feelings on account of the wilful and wicked stubbornness of his  brother and was about to leave the house; But his aged  who was present, requested him not to do so. He hearkened to his  advice, the house was brought to order, after much debate upon  the subject and the council resumed business. & his  wife were both acquitted of the charges against them.

30 October 1835 • Friday

Friday 30th He was at home. This day Mr. Francis Porter, a mem ber of the Methodist Episcopal church from N.Y.  called to make some inquiry about lands in this place, whether  there are any farms for sale that are valuable, and whether  a member of our church could move into this vicinity and enjoy  his own possessions and property without making it common stock.
He had been requested to do so by some brethren, who live in , Jeffer son County N. Y. He [JS] replied that he had a valuable farm joining the   lot that He would sell, and that there are other lands for sale  in this place, that there is no commonstock business, among us, and that [p. 113]
that it was generally the case that too much altercation was indulged on both sides, and their debates protracted to an unprofitable length. He was now called to his supper. After being seated around the table, observed to , that the thought had just occurred to his mind, that perhaps, in about one year from that time they might be seated together, around a table in the land of Zion. His observed, on hearing this remark, she hoped it might be the case, that not only they, but the rest of the company present might be seated around a table in that land of promise. The same sentiment was reciprocated by the company round the table, to which his full soul seemed to respond his hearty amen, praying God to grant it in the name of Jesus Christ. After supper he went again to the High Council, accompanied at this time, with his , and some others that belonged to his household. He was solicited to take a seat with the Presidency, and preside in the case of Sister Mary Cahoon Elliott. He did so, his was mother was called as testimony and began to relate circumstances that had previously been brought before the church and settled. He objected against such testimony. The Complainant, arose and accused him of invalidating or doubting his ’s’ testimony, which he had not done, nor had he any desire to do so. He told his Brother he was out of place and asked him to set down: but he refused; the request was repeated and became enraged. He was finally ordered to set down, but said he would not, unless he was knocked down. By this time he (President J. S. Junr.) became wounded and agitated in his feelings on account of the wilful and wicked stubbornness of his brother and was about to leave the house; But his aged who was present, requested him not to do so. He hearkened to his advice, the house was brought to order, after much debate upon the subject and the council resumed business. & his wife were both acquitted of the charges against them.

30 October 1835 • Friday

Friday 30th He was at home. This day Mr. Francis Porter, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church from N.Y. called to make some inquiry about lands in this place, whether there are any farms for sale that are valuable, and whether a member of our church could move into this vicinity and enjoy his own possessions and property without making it common stock.
He had been requested to do so by some brethren, who live in , Jefferson County N. Y. He JS replied that he had a valuable farm joining the lot that He would sell, and that there are other lands for sale in this place, that there is no commonstock business, among us, and that [p. 113]
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