History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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having heard many reports of an unfavourable character, he desired now to know the truth of the matter.
He appeared to be an honest inquirer. Pres. Smith spent the evening with him, in conversation, & found him to be a candid man; but without any peculiarities about him except his simplicity, he tarried over night [with] us, and acknowledged in the morning, that although he had thought that he knew something about religion, he was now convinced, that he knew but little, which was the greatest trait of wisdom which he displayed.
5 December 1835 • Saturday
Saturday 5th. This morning the weather is cold & the snow is gently dropping from the heavens, & there is a prospect of sleighing again.— Presdts. & called and spent the fore noon in studying Hebrew with us.— our author Pres. Smith is labouring under a slight indisposition of health; but after taking a little repose, he resumed his wonted cheerfulness and throug[h] the blessings of God was abled to attend to his business. on this day he received a letter from dated at NewYork, and another from ’s mother in law, dated at N.Y. of no consequ[e]nce as to what it contained but cost us 25 cents for postage; he mentioned this because it [is] a common occurrence, and he is subjected to a great expense in this way, by those who he knows nothing about, only that they are destitute of good manners, for if people wish to be benefited by his counsel & instruction, common respect, and good breeding would dictate them to pay the postage on their letters.
6 December 1835 • Sunday
Sunday 6th. He as usual attended meeting, being ever constant at the shrine of public & private devotion, setting an example of unremitting, & untiring zeal and piety teaching, & enforcing, both by precept, and example, the principles, & doctrines, of the holy religion he professes.
Eldr. occupied the desk in the morning and delivered an interesting discourse. In the P.M. an exhortation was delivered, and the Lords supper administered. br. Draper came forward to make a [p. 141]
having heard many reports of an unfavourable character, he desired now to know the truth of the matter.
He appeared to be an honest inquirer. Pres. Smith spent the evening with him, in conversation, & found him to be a candid man; but without any peculiarities about him except his simplicity, he tarried over night with us, and acknowledged in the morning, that although he had thought that he knew something about religion, he was now convinced, that he knew but little, which was the greatest trait of wisdom which he displayed.
5 December 1835 • Saturday
Saturday 5th. This morning the weather is cold & the snow is gently dropping from the heavens, & there is a prospect of sleighing again.— Presdts. & called and spent the fore noon in studying Hebrew with us.— our author Pres. Smith is labouring under a slight indisposition of health; but after taking a little repose, he resumed his wonted cheerfulness and through the blessings of God was abled to attend to his business. on this day he received a letter from dated at NewYork, and another from ’s mother in law, dated at N.Y. of no consequence as to what it contained but cost us 25 cents for postage; he mentioned this because it is a common occurrence, and he is subjected to a great expense in this way, by those who he knows nothing about, only that they are destitute of good manners, for if people wish to be benefited by his counsel & instruction, common respect, and good breeding would dictate them to pay the postage on their letters.
6 December 1835 • Sunday
Sunday 6th. He as usual attended meeting, being ever constant at the shrine of public & private devotion, setting an example of unremitting, & untiring zeal and piety teaching, & enforcing, both by precept, and example, the principles, & doctrines, of the holy religion he professes.
Eldr. occupied the desk in the morning and delivered an interesting discourse. In the P.M. an exhortation was delivered, and the Lords supper administered. br. Draper came forward to make a [p. 141]
Page 141