History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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every man enjoys his own property; or he can if he is be disposed  consecrate liberally or illiberally to support the poor & needy  or to the building up of Zion, He also inquired how many  members there were in this church. He was told there were  about five or six hundred who communed at our chapel  and that perhaps, there were one thousand in this vicinity.
At evening the subject of this narrative was presented with a  letter from his brother , the purport of which was that  that he was censured by the brethren, in consequence of what  took place in the council the preceding evening: he also wished  to have the cause of censure removed to the satisfaction and  understanding of all, that he might not unjustly be censured  or made to suffer in his feelings. He then considered that  he had been materially injured. He (J.S. Jnr.) replied that he  thought they parted with the best of feelings, and that he was not  accountable for the dissatisfaction of others. was invited  by Joseph, to call and talk with him, assuring him that he  would converse in the spirit of meekness on the subject, and  give him all the satisfaction he could. This reply was by  letter and a copy retained.

31 October 1835 • Saturday

Saturday 31st In the morning his Brother  called in and said he had been much trou[b]led all night, and  had not slept any. He said something was wrong, and while  they were conversing his brother came in according to his  (Joseph’s) request last night. His brother observed that he  must go to the Store. He was invited by Joseph to stay; he replied  that he could go and do his business and return: He did so, and  during his absence introduced the subject of their difficul ties at the council. Joseph told him he did not want to  converse upon that subject until returned. He  soon came in, and it was proposed to relate the ocurrences of  the Council before named, and wherein he (Joseph) had done wrong  he would confess it and ask his forgiveness; and then he  () should relate his story and make confession  wherein he had done wrong, and then leave it to  brother & to decide the matter  between them, and he would agree to the decision and be  satisfied therewith. observed that he had not done wrong  and that Joseph was always determined to carry every point  whether right or wrong, and, therefore, he could not stand [p. 114]
every man enjoys his own property; or he can if he be disposed consecrate liberally or illiberally to support the poor & needy or to the building up of Zion, He also inquired how many members there were in this church. He was told there were about five or six hundred who communed at our chapel and that perhaps, there were one thousand in this vicinity.
At evening the subject of this narrative was presented with a letter from his brother , the purport of which was that that he was censured by the brethren, in consequence of what took place in the council the preceding evening: he also wished to have the cause of censure removed to the satisfaction and understanding of all, that he might not unjustly be censured or made to suffer in his feelings. He then considered that he had been materially injured. He (J.S. Jnr.) replied that he thought they parted with the best of feelings, and that he was not accountable for the dissatisfaction of others. was invited by Joseph, to call and talk with him, assuring him that he would converse in the spirit of meekness on the subject, and give him all the satisfaction he could. This reply was by letter and a copy retained.

31 October 1835 • Saturday

Saturday 31st In the morning his Brother called in and said he had been much troubled all night, and had not slept any. He said something was wrong, and while they were conversing his brother came in according to his (Joseph’s) request last night. His brother observed that he must go to the Store. He was invited by Joseph to stay; he replied that he could go and do his business and return: He did so, and during his absence introduced the subject of their difficulties at the council. Joseph told him he did not want to converse upon that subject until returned. He soon came in, and it was proposed to relate the ocurrences of the Council before named, and wherein he (Joseph) had done wrong he would confess it and ask his forgiveness; and then he () should relate his story and make confession wherein he had done wrong, and then leave it to brother & to decide the matter between them, and he would agree to the decision and be satisfied therewith. observed that he had not done wrong and that Joseph was always determined to carry every point whether right or wrong, and, therefore, he could not stand [p. 114]
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