Discourse, 5 February 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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degrade and brutalize the human species. There was much in his precepts, if they were followed, that would soften the asperities of man towards man, and that would tend to make him a more rational being than he is generally found to be. There was no violence; no fury; no denunciation. His religion appears to be the religion of meekness; lowliness, and mild persuasion.
To <​Towards​> the close of his address, he remarked that he had been represented as pretending to be a Saviour, a Worker of Miracles, &c. All this was false. He made no such pretensions. He was but a man, he said— a plain untutored <​man​>; seeking what he should do to be saved. He performed no miracles. He did not pretend to possess any such power
He closed by referring to the Mormon Bible, which, he said, contained nothing inconsistent or conflicting with the Christian Bible. And he again repeated,
that all who would follow the precepts of the Bible whether Mormon or not, would assuredly be saved. Throughout his whole address, he displayed, strongly, a spirit of Charity and Forbearance
The Mormon Bible, he said, was communicated to him, direct from Heaven. If there was such a thing on Earth, as the Author of it, then he (Smith) was the Author; but the idea that he wished to impress was, that he had penned it as dictated by God. [p. [3]]
degrade and brutalize the human species. There was much in his precepts, if they were followed, that would soften the asperities of man towards man, and that would tend to make him a more rational being than he is generally found to be. There was no violence; no fury; no denunciation. His religion appears to be the religion of meekness; lowliness, and mild persuasion.
Towards the close of his address, he remarked that he had been represented as pretending to be a Saviour, a Worker of Miracles, &c. All this was false. He made no such pretensions. He was but a man, he said— a plain untutored man; seeking what he should do to be saved. He performed no miracles. He did not pretend to possess any such power
He closed by referring to the Mormon Bible, which, he said, contained nothing inconsistent or conflicting with the Christian Bible. And he again repeated,
that all who would follow the precepts of the Bible whether Mormon or not, would assuredly be saved. Throughout his whole address, he displayed, strongly, a spirit of Charity and Forbearance
The Mormon Bible, he said, was communicated to him, direct from Heaven. If there was such a thing on Earth, as the Author of it, then he (Smith) was the Author; but the idea that he wished to impress was, that he had penned it as dictated by God. [p. [3]]
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