John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 72
image
made their escape in the night with their families, but were followed the next day by twenty horseman from without success. The Mormons were still collected at and at and a small company also collected at who lived in that section of the country. seeing the tumult and uproar called out the militia. The news of this pleased me, for I thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course observe good order, and it was also stated that ’s object was to investigate the affair and bring the guilty to punishment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the . But in a short time two or three companies of Militia came upon them; from what cause I know not. A battle was the result, and some twenty or thirty Mormons were killed, but none of the Militia as I heard but some wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but I heard one of the Militia tell that a well twenty or therity feet deep was filled up with their <​dead bodies​> to within three feet of the top. These troops I was told were from and and some from Carol [Carroll], but by what authority they fell upon these [p. 72]
made their escape in the night with their families, but were followed the next day by twenty horseman from without success. The Mormons were still collected at and at and a small company also collected at who lived in that section of the country. seeing the tumult and uproar called out the militia. The news of this pleased me, for I thought that if they turned out under authority they would of course observe good order, and it was also stated that ’s object was to investigate the affair and bring the guilty to punishment, and rescue the innocent. I was informed that the Mormons at made a covenant with the other citizens to let each other alone, and the Mormons were to remain at the . But in a short time two or three companies of Militia came upon them; from what cause I know not. A battle was the result, and some twenty or thirty Mormons were killed, but none of the Militia as I heard but some wounded. There were different reports about the number killed, but I heard one of the Militia tell that a well twenty or therity feet deep was filled up with their dead bodies to within three feet of the top. These troops I was told were from and and some from Carol [Carroll], but by what authority they fell upon these [p. 72]
Page 72