John Fletcher Darby Papers, Missouri History Museum Archives, St. Louis.

John Corrill, “Brief History,” Manuscript, circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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make proposals of peace. He promised that no harm should befal us that night. He stated that their object was to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an opportunity to escape befor they would attact the place. That night the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house logs boards &c on that side of town next the army, but it was about a good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments &c. but this breast work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an attact from the othr. Next morning at the time appointed , and went with the white flag and met Generals and some other officers who informed us that they were waiting for whom they expected soon with the s order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace untill it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us.
They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same time informed us that had the chief command. Smith appeared much alarmed and told me to beg like a dog for peace, and afterwards said he had rather [p. 74]
make proposals of peace. He promised that no harm should befal us that night. He stated that their object was to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an opportunity to escape befor they would attact the place. That night the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house logs boards &c on that side of town next the army, but it was about a good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments &c. but this breast work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an attact from the othr. Next morning at the time appointed , and went with the white flag and met Generals and some other officers who informed us that they were waiting for whom they expected soon with the s order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace untill it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us.
They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same time informed us that had the chief command. Smith appeared much alarmed and told me to beg like a dog for peace, and afterwards said he had rather [p. 74]
Page 74