Letter from Heber C. Kimball, 9 July 1840

  • Source Note
Page 861
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count of a heavy snow storm on the lake. On the 27th we arrived at . On the 28th the brethren left me at Byron eight miles east of Batavia and pursued their course to the east, I stayed to visit my friends at Byron,
Next day I took cars for the city of , and found one of my sisters there. Taking a violent cold I was confined here about a week During this time I stayed one night with Brother , he lives two miles from the city. He was glad to see me, and inquired much about you and the rest of the brethren: he seemed to be firm in the faith of the gospel and has much love for his brethren. then took me in his wagon and carried me to Victor within twelve or fourteen miles of the place where you obtained the record of the Book of Mormon. I remained there until about the tenth of February, preached in Victor twice, baptised three, one of them was my ’s brother and his wife. The snow continued about three feet deep while I was there, being very cold and blustering. There is much good feeling towards us as a poople [people] in that region.
I took coach at for , being short of money to pay my expenses I was confined to one meal a day. When I got to , the North river being froze up, I went part of the way on the ice on runners, and part of the way by land on wheels. When we went to Jersey city, (as we went up on that side,) the coachman not being willing to fulfil his engagement and take us over to . and I being destitute of money, I mentioned it to the passengers and a gentleman put his hand in his pocket and gave me a quarter dollar. Then, when we got to the Ferry, the ferryman wanted six-pence more each; not having any, it prompted me to pray to the Lord to blind his eyes so that he might overlook me, it was even so; so we see that God will hear prayer when we call upon him for small things. We went across the river and put up at the Hotel, where I pawned my trunk for my supper and breakfast.
Next morning I went in pursuit of the brethren, being Sabbath day morning. The first one I met with was Elder , I then found Elders and , and the rest of the brethren; and if I ever felt to praise God it was then, to get in company with my brethren again. I went with the brethren to meeting and my wants were made known, and I received means to redeem my trunk. The rest of the brethren were in similar circumstances with myself, having come into the in like manner. When we arrived there we found the saints faithful, but not many adding. We concluded it best to lift up our voices and preach the gospel, and in about two or three weeks, there was upwards of forty added. These together with the other saints administered to our wants and provided for us provisions, bedding and money to go to .
I never saw greater kindness than was manifested towards us in , , and other places: and I feel to bless them in the name of the Lord, that his peace shall rest upon them. On the 9th day of March, six of us went aboard the ship Patrick Henry, viz: , , , , and ; many of the saints went along with us to the ship’s side, where we bade them farewell. We set sail the same day and on the 6th day of April, we landed at , in tolerable health,
During our passage over we had two very heavy gales; the ship’s mate said he had not seen such for fifteen years back: the ship’s crew was kind to us. We remained in until the 9th in company with who had been there a short time and raised a small church.
On the 9th we took cars for , where in a short time we found Elders , , and well and in good spirits promulgating the gospel through the towns and cities. Their joy was great to see us, yea, beyond measure; they had often longed to see us and prayed that the Lord would send us unto them, the saints universally were rejoiced to see us and the news of our arrival spread far and near in a short time. Our enemies had reproached the saints and boasted, because (they said) we should never return; and in fact it was believed amongst the enemies that we should no more return. The saints had been troubled some on this account, and consequently their joy was greatly increased to see my face again, and still more to see some of my brethren with me,
Many blessings were poured upon us from all quarters, especially from those who were baptized before we left ; we also found that those who had joined the church since that time, joined in the theme of rejoicing, and hailed us with a hearty welcome. As soon as the general bustle was subsided the Twelve met in council and organized themselves, and ordained into the quorum.—Then on the 15th, the churches met in conference in the cock-pit at ; the total number of members represented was one thousand six hundred and seventy-one; the churches all in good standing, excepting two. From that conference the brethren separated to different [p. 861]
count of a heavy snow storm on the lake. On the 27th we arrived at . On the 28th the brethren left me at Byron eight miles east of Batavia and pursued their course to the east, I stayed to visit my friends at Byron,
Next day I took cars for the city of , and found one of my sisters there. Taking a violent cold I was confined here about a week During this time I stayed one night with Brother , he lives two miles from the city. He was glad to see me, and inquired much about you and the rest of the brethren: he seemed to be firm in the faith of the gospel and has much love for his brethren. then took me in his wagon and carried me to Victor within twelve or fourteen miles of the place where you obtained the record of the Book of Mormon. I remained there until about the tenth of February, preached in Victor twice, baptised three, one of them was my ’s brother and his wife. The snow continued about three feet deep while I was there, being very cold and blustering. There is much good feeling towards us as a poople [people] in that region.
I took coach at for , being short of money to pay my expenses I was confined to one meal a day. When I got to , the North river being froze up, I went part of the way on the ice on runners, and part of the way by land on wheels. When we went to Jersey city, (as we went up on that side,) the coachman not being willing to fulfil his engagement and take us over to . and I being destitute of money, I mentioned it to the passengers and a gentleman put his hand in his pocket and gave me a quarter dollar. Then, when we got to the Ferry, the ferryman wanted six-pence more each; not having any, it prompted me to pray to the Lord to blind his eyes so that he might overlook me, it was even so; so we see that God will hear prayer when we call upon him for small things. We went across the river and put up at the Hotel, where I pawned my trunk for my supper and breakfast.
Next morning I went in pursuit of the brethren, being Sabbath day morning. The first one I met with was Elder , I then found Elders and , and the rest of the brethren; and if I ever felt to praise God it was then, to get in company with my brethren again. I went with the brethren to meeting and my wants were made known, and I received means to redeem my trunk. The rest of the brethren were in similar circumstances with myself, having come into the in like manner. When we arrived there we found the saints faithful, but not many adding. We concluded it best to lift up our voices and preach the gospel, and in about two or three weeks, there was upwards of forty added. These together with the other saints administered to our wants and provided for us provisions, bedding and money to go to .
I never saw greater kindness than was manifested towards us in , , and other places: and I feel to bless them in the name of the Lord, that his peace shall rest upon them. On the 9th day of March, six of us went aboard the ship Patrick Henry, viz: , , , , and ; many of the saints went along with us to the ship’s side, where we bade them farewell. We set sail the same day and on the 6th day of April, we landed at , in tolerable health,
During our passage over we had two very heavy gales; the ship’s mate said he had not seen such for fifteen years back: the ship’s crew was kind to us. We remained in until the 9th in company with who had been there a short time and raised a small church.
On the 9th we took cars for , where in a short time we found Elders , , and well and in good spirits promulgating the gospel through the towns and cities. Their joy was great to see us, yea, beyond measure; they had often longed to see us and prayed that the Lord would send us unto them, the saints universally were rejoiced to see us and the news of our arrival spread far and near in a short time. Our enemies had reproached the saints and boasted, because (they said) we should never return; and in fact it was believed amongst the enemies that we should no more return. The saints had been troubled some on this account, and consequently their joy was greatly increased to see my face again, and still more to see some of my brethren with me,
Many blessings were poured upon us from all quarters, especially from those who were baptized before we left ; we also found that those who had joined the church since that time, joined in the theme of rejoicing, and hailed us with a hearty welcome. As soon as the general bustle was subsided the Twelve met in council and organized themselves, and ordained into the quorum.—Then on the 15th, the churches met in conference in the cock-pit at ; the total number of members represented was one thousand six hundred and seventy-one; the churches all in good standing, excepting two. From that conference the brethren separated to different [p. 861]
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