Letter from Oliver Olney, 31 October 1842

  • Source Note
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Citty of Oct 31st 1842
To Presidant Joseph Smith
It is with no ordinary feelings that I address you at this time in writing
But as I have a leisure moment I improve it in writing you a few lines That you may know my mind at this time
I will say that I am differantly situated from what I was one year or Eighteen months ago I was then in trouble because of many things my mind was unsetled In doings As I se[e] much adoings I often felt to mourn lest I should make mismoves I look at my self and at the Church Also the order of God And I se[e] their must be a Union amongst those that covenant to do his will
I looked at my own weakness and unworthine[ss] That we must say is the common lot of all That has from choise taken a probation I looked to my superiors for Instructions and was entirely willing to be governed by them Untill I found them to be against me that I se[e] no sympathy of feeling to wards me But a feeling to tred me underfoot
That never was my name it I never [bore?] neither is it required of any man But many submit to it
My wrights is what I claim and must have Without takeing the wrights of others I look at your wrights and the work you have don[e] and say its of great worth to bring a bout the purposes of God
I look at many as well as your self that must in the due time of the Lord have something to do That no one can say all rests on me [p. [1]]
Citty of Oct 31st 1842
To Presidant Joseph Smith
It is with no ordinary feelings that I address you at this time in writing
But as I have a leisure moment I improve it in writing you a few lines That you may know my mind at this time
I will say that I am differantly situated from what I was one year or Eighteen months ago I was then in trouble because of many things my mind was unsetled In doings As I see much adoings I often felt to mourn lest I should make mismoves I look at my self and at the Church Also the order of God And I see their must be a Union amongst those that covenant to do his will
I looked at my own weakness and unworthiness That we must say is the common lot of all That has from choise taken a probation I looked to my superiors for Instructions and was entirely willing to be governed by them Untill I found them to be against me that I see no sympathy of feeling to wards me But a feeling to tred me underfoot
That never was my name it I never [bore?] neither is it required of any man But many submit to it
My wrights is what I claim and must have Without takeing the wrights of others I look at your wrights and the work you have done and say its of great worth to bring a bout the purposes of God
I look at many as well as your self that must in the due time of the Lord have something to do That no one can say all rests on me [p. [1]]
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